Regardless of the number of games and sets in a match, players must continuously rotate sides when the total number of games in a set is an odd number. For instance, if the total game score in a set is 3-2, simply add 3 + 2 = 5. Since 5 is an odd number, the players rotate sides prior to starting the next game. If the total game score in a set is 5-1, simply add 5 + 1 = 6. Since 6 is an even number, the players do not rotate sides.

Outside Australasia, the single achieved modest commercial success. It peaked at number 78 on the Canadian Hot 100 and remained for five weeks on the chart.[61] The track earned platinum certification from Music Canada, which denotes shipments of 80,000 copies in the country.[62] The single had the similar position on the UK Singles Chart and was certified silver by the British Phonographic Industry for track-equivalent sales of 200,000 units, based on sales and streams.[63][64] It also entered the top 100 of the German Singles Chart, where it reached number 83.[65] Despite not entering the record chart of Norway, the song was certified platinum by IFPI Norway for exceeding sales of 10,000 units in the country.[66] In the US, "Tennis Court" debuted at number 71, which was also its highest placement, on the Billboard Hot 100 chart dated 19 October 2013.[67] The single spent 18 weeks on the chart and had sold 355,000 copies in the US by April 2014.[68][18] It also reached number nine on the Hot Rock Songs, a Billboard auxiliary chart.[69]

The referee, who is usually located off the court, is the final authority about tennis rules. When called to the court by a player or team captain, the referee may overrule the umpire's decision if the tennis rules were violated (question of law) but may not change the umpire's decision on a question of fact. If, however, the referee is on the court during play, the referee may overrule the umpire's decision (This would only happen in Davis Cup or Fed Cup matches, not at the World Group level, when a chair umpire from a non-neutral country is in the chair).[59]


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In 1913, the International Lawn Tennis Federation (ILTF), now the International Tennis Federation (ITF), was founded and established three official tournaments as the major championships of the day. The World Grass Court Championships were awarded to Great Britain. The World Hard Court Championships were awarded to France; the term "hard court" was used for clay courts at the time. Some tournaments were held in Belgium instead. And the World Covered Court Championships for indoor courts was awarded annually; Sweden, France, Great Britain, Denmark, Switzerland and Spain each hosted the tournament.[28] At a meeting held on 16 March 1923 in Paris, the title 'World Championship' was dropped and a new category of Official Championship was created for events in Great Britain, France, the United States, and Australia – today's Grand Slam events.[29][30] The impact on the four recipient nations to replace the ‘world championships’ with ‘official championships’ was simple in a general sense: each became a major nation of the federation with enhanced voting power and each now operated a major event.[31]

Hi, my name is Jamie. I have been teaching tennis for about 14 years and have a love and passion for teaching tennis to anyone who is wanting to learn and improve their game. I have been working at Punahou School for the last 12 years and have done group, private, and cardio tennis lessons there and have a good foundation of how to build lessons and skills within my students through effective progressions that have worked to build state ranked juniors. I am USPTA Certified and Cardio Certified. Please let me know how I can help you to work on technique and strategy through a game based learning approach. ... View Profile
The frame of rackets for all sports was traditionally made of solid wood (later laminated wood) and the strings of animal intestine known as catgut. The traditional racket size was limited by the strength and weight of the wooden frame which had to be strong enough to hold the strings and stiff enough to hit the ball or shuttle. Manufacturers started adding non-wood laminates to wood rackets to improve stiffness. Non-wood rackets were made first of steel, then of aluminum, and then carbon fiber composites. Wood is still used for real tennis, rackets, and xare. Most rackets are now made of composite materials including carbon fiber or fiberglass, metals such as titanium alloys, or ceramics.
So to answer the question – there are many balls because motor learning (learning how to hit and move) takes many repetitions and the coach is ready for that. He also knows that you will probably miss many times before you get the right feel. It's not a life or death question, it's just learning to move in a new way. Are you ready to start with tennis for beginners and do you have realistic expectations?
Focus on ball trajectory and how cleanly you hit the ball – this will then allow your brain to merge the technical instruction you’ve been working on with the natural way of movement that creates effortless power – and eventually sound tennis techniques will emerge that simultaneously produce a lot of effortless power and allow easy adjustments to different situations in the game.
The decision to install a top-of-the-line concrete court is just the beginning, however. You also need to evaluate your site, determine the type of playing surface you want, choose a surfacing system, and even pick out a color scheme. The next step is to find a qualified, experienced contractor who can install the court you want at a fair price. Here are some of the basics you need to know before getting in the game.
"Tennis Court" was played during the 2013 Wimbledon Championships – Women's Singles Final by British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC).[88] "Tennis Court" was remixed by Australian musician Flume in 2014.[89] In July 2014 American producer Diplo released his version, titled the Diplo's Andre Agassi Reebok Pump Mix.[90] In 2014, "Tennis Court" was featured in the soundtrack of the PlayStation 4, Xbox One and Microsoft Windows versions of Grand Theft Auto V.[91]
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The players (or teams) start on opposite sides of the net. One player is designated the server, and the opposing player is the receiver. The choice to be server or receiver in the first game and the choice of ends is decided by a coin toss before the warm-up starts. Service alternates game by game between the two players (or teams). For each point, the server starts behind the baseline, between the center mark and the sideline. The receiver may start anywhere on their side of the net. When the receiver is ready, the server will serve, although the receiver must play to the pace of the server.
For length, 21 to 26 inches (53 to 66 cm) is normally the junior racket range, while 27 inches (69 cm) is for stronger more physically-mature players. Some are also available at lengths of 27.5 to 29 inches (70 to 74 cm). The Gamma Big Bubba was produced with a 32 inches (81 cm) length but it is no longer legal in that length. Gamma responded by changing the length of the grip portion of the racket, to continue sales. The length restriction was based on the concern that such long rackets would make the serve too dominant, but that concern has never been objectively supported with testing. Moreover, some players, such as John Isner, are much taller and have longer arms than average professionals (and especially low stature ones), giving them a much larger advantage in terms of height for the service than is possible with several inches of racket length. This makes the length restriction more questionable. Finally, the professionals who nearly always choose to use the longest rackets typically choose them because they use two-handed groundstrokes for both forehand and backhand, using the extra length to improve their reach. An example is Marion Bartoli. As this type of player is not dominant in the sport, or even close to being average in terms of per capita representation, the length restriction seems even more unnecessary. Despite Prince's attempt to market longer length "longbody" rackets in the 1990s, standard length remains the overwhelming choice of players, further negating the argument in favor of the length restriction. When most players who choose to use a longer racket than 27 inches (69 cm) choose one, they typically only use a 27.5 inches (70 cm) model, rather than one approaching 30 inches (76 cm). Longer rackets were introduced by Dunlop[10]
I accept your thesis — kids & adults learn tennis differently. But there’s a corrolary: As someone who began tennis 10 yerars ago as a retirement activity, I’m confronted by others in my over-70 age group who — I swear — began hitting tennis balls before they could walk. There’s no way I can catch up with them. Should I give up, & just play with others “at my level”? [This is a serious question.] Or should I attempt one-person drills with the aim of improving?
I’ve spent years in attempts to understand tennis techniques and secrets that few people ever learn in tennis lessons. Most competitive junior tennis players have the privilege of time and money to develop and learn tennis techniques, but maybe you don’t. Tennis techniques are an important part for every tennis player and even small changes in tennis technique can result in big improvements.
Another benefit of post-tensioning is that contractors can build larger slabs using thinner concrete sections, and they don't have to install control joints which can interfere with play. "In order to build a reinforced concrete court that has the same structural capabilities as a post-tensioned court, we would have to install so much steel and concrete that the reinforced court would actually cost more," says Kolkmann. "Also, a reinforced court needs control joints, usually at a spacing of 10 to 15 feet, including in the playing area. Eventually these joints may widen, as well as any cracks that appear."
Advantage sets sometimes continue much longer than tie-break sets. The 2010 Wimbledon first-round match between John Isner and Nicolas Mahut, which is the longest professional tennis match in history, notably ended with Isner winning the fifth set by 70–68. The match lasted in total 11 hours and five minutes, with the fifth set alone lasting eight hours, 11 minutes. Whoever wins by a margin of two wins the set, but this could take a very long time to finish.

For a right-handed player, the forehand is a stroke that begins on the right side of the body, continues across the body as contact is made with the ball, and ends on the left side of the body. There are various grips for executing the forehand, and their popularity has fluctuated over the years. The most important ones are the continental, the eastern, the semi-western, and the western. For a number of years, the small, frail 1920s player Bill Johnston was considered by many to have had the best forehand of all time, a stroke that he hit shoulder-high using a western grip. Few top players used the western grip after the 1920s, but in the latter part of the 20th century, as shot-making techniques and equipment changed radically, the western forehand made a strong comeback and is now used by many modern players. No matter which grip is used, most forehands are generally executed with one hand holding the racket, but there have been fine players with two-handed forehands. In the 1940s and 50s, the Ecuadorian/American player Pancho Segura used a two-handed forehand to achieve a devastating effect against larger, more powerful players. Players such as Monica Seles or France's Fabrice Santoro and Marion Bartoli are also notable players known for their two-handed forehands.[76]
One thing all test players could quickly agree on: The Burn FST 99 can be swung very fast. With all shots the club could be swung and maneuvered extremely fast. This way, we always got the club into the optimum stroke position, even with fast rallies. The comfort is also surprisingly high, considering that the racquet with a frame hardness of 72RA is actually rather hard. The relatively thin frame of the racquet made it possible for the racquet to give way in exactly the right places and thus to cushion the impact well when hitting the ball.
A legal service starts a rally, in which the players alternate hitting the ball across the net. A legal return consists of the player or team hitting the ball before it has bounced twice or hit any fixtures except the net, provided that it still falls in the server's court. A player or team cannot hit the ball twice in a row. The ball must travel past the net into the other players' court. A ball that hits the net during a rally is still considered a legal return as long as it crosses into the opposite side of the court. The first player or team to fail to make a legal return loses the point. The server then moves to the other side of the service line at the start of a new point.[54]

A match consists of a sequence of sets. The outcome is determined through a best of three or five sets system. On the professional circuit, men play best-of-five-set matches at all four Grand Slam tournaments, Davis Cup, and the final of the Olympic Games and best-of-three-set matches at all other tournaments, while women play best-of-three-set matches at all tournaments. The first player to win two sets in a best-of-three, or three sets in a best-of-five, wins the match.[56] Only in the final sets of matches at the Australian Open, the French Open, Wimbledon, the Olympic Games, Davis Cup (until 2015), and Fed Cup are tie-breaks not played. In these cases, sets are played indefinitely until one player has a two-game lead, leading to some remarkably long matches.
In the US, "Tennis Court" was released as a 7-inch vinyl single on 27 August 2013.[14] Lava and Republic Records initially planned to service "Tennis Court" to US modern rock radio on 11 March 2014 and contemporary hit radio (CHR) on 8 April 2014 as the album's third US airplay single, following "Royals" and "Team".[15] Republic cancelled the scheduled release in favour of "Glory and Gore", which impacted modern rock radio on 11 March.[16][17] The label also planned to service "Glory and Gore" to CHR, but subsequently called of its release and serviced "Tennis Court" to CHR as originally planned.[18] "Tennis Court" ultimately impacted hot adult contemporary radio and CHR on 21 and 22 April 2014, respectively.[19][20] It was released to UK radio on 12 May 2014.[21]
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Try a backhand stroke. The backhand is one of the easiest strokes to master. Grip the racquet with both hands and hold it out to the side. It should look similar to a baseball player at bat. When the ball approaches, hit it hard at a slight upward angle. This stroke hits the ball hard and is a great way to be sure that your ball will get into the service area.[9]
This is Kirill’s twice-a-week way of reminding me, however inadvertently, that I started playing tennis too late. Footwork is key to tennis, and taking short strides as you are approaching the ball sets in place the underpinnings of everything that might lead to a good shot. Short steps allow one to be neither too close to nor too far astride the ball. But short steps are not what you learn when you spend your childhood playing football and baseball and basketball.
Moving, always moving, and all the time thinking and checking off: Maintain the continental grip, the base knuckle of the index finger of my left hand resting on the bevel one notch counterclockwise from the racket handle’s high noon. (Check.) Keep the racket in front and the racket head up. (Check.) Knees slightly bent. (Check.) Turn sideways quickly, and punch with your shoulder, don’t swing; and tighten your grip at the moment the ball is about to hit the strings.
One thing all test players could quickly agree on: The Burn FST 99 can be swung very fast. With all shots the club could be swung and maneuvered extremely fast. This way, we always got the club into the optimum stroke position, even with fast rallies. The comfort is also surprisingly high, considering that the racquet with a frame hardness of 72RA is actually rather hard. The relatively thin frame of the racquet made it possible for the racquet to give way in exactly the right places and thus to cushion the impact well when hitting the ball.
So, if you are reading this one, you are probably a parent who sees some talent in their child and wants them to go pro when they grow up. It is essential for your child to start Tennis at a very young age, like close to 5-6 years. What this does is make the game instilled in their muscle memory forever. Tennis becomes a habit for them and it becomes second nature.
^ Jump up to: a b "Grays of Cambridge: History" Archived 2011-07-06 at the Wayback Machine - makers of rackets and founded in 1855 by Henry John Gray, the Champion Racquets Player of England. "In those days, the rackets were made from one piece English ash, with a suede leather grip and natural gut. ... The 1980s witnessed a period of re-structuring and consolidation. The Cambridge racquets factory was forced to close in face of the move to graphite rackets, and production was moved to the Far east."
The ProCushion System, depicted in the illustration above, is the ultimate professional and residential cushioned option for tennis court surfaces. This 100% acrylic coating system is designed to provide optimum resilience and spin responsive play. The shock absorbing layers of the ProCushion system provide unparalleled player comfort at an affordable cost. Flexible acrylic binders maximize the feel of the rubber granules for decades after application.
Lorde performed "Tennis Court" at the 2014 Billboard Music Awards in May.[81] The following month, she performed a medley of "Tennis Court" and "Team" at the 2014 MuchMusic Video Awards.[82] Lorde also performed the song during several music festivals, including the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival in Indio, California,[83] the Laneway Festival in Sydney,[84] Lollapalooza Brazil in Sao Paulo.[85] At the Lollapalooza Festival in Grant Park, Chicago on 1 August 2014, she performed the track among other songs from Pure Heroine. Billboard picked Lorde's performance as the fifth best of the festival.[86] Rolling Stone deemed her set list the highlight of the event, writing that "She danced like she was trying to fling her arms off her body, but just as with her voice, the sense that she was in absolute possession of her abilities never waned. She nailed every stomp and every note — but it was clearly fueled by passion, not perfection".[87]

The Tennis Complex (6 courts) is located on the north-west side of campus just behind Dedeaux Baseball Field.  Courts are open for general use during Lyon Center operating hours, however, Athletics and Physical Education take priority during the times listed below.  Please note that courts are washed on Friday mornings and lights will remain on 30 minutes after Lyon Center closing.  Two courts have been newly resurfaced with sport court material. This multi-purpose surface allows individuals to play tennis, soccer, floor hockey, volleyball and basketball.


Grass courts are the fastest type of courts in common use.[7] They consist of grass grown on very hard-packed soil, which adds additional variables: bounces depend on how healthy the grass is, how recently it has been mowed, and the wear and tear of recent play. Points are usually very quick where fast, low bounces keep rallies short, and the serve plays a more important role than on other surfaces. Grass courts tend to favour serve-and-volley tennis players.

The reason is simple – the coach knows that repetition is the mother of skill and a tennis beginner will have to make many repetitions before he'll be able to master the stroke. And one more thing – the stroke is not only the arm movement, but consists of the movement to the ball, stopping, balancing and hitting the ball. It's a complex action which takes time to become our second nature.

A game consists of a sequence of points played with the same player serving, and is won by the first side to have won at least four points with a margin of two points or more over their opponent. Normally the server's score is always called first and the receiver's score second. Score calling in tennis is unusual in that (except in tie-breaks) each point has a corresponding call that is different from its point value. The current point score is announced orally before each point by the judge, or by the server if there is no judge.
"Carpet" in tennis means any removable court covering.[7] Indoor arenas store rolls of rubber-backed court surfacing and install it temporarily for tennis events, but they are not in use any more for professional events. A short piled form of artificial turf infilled with sand is used for some outdoor courts, particularly in Asia. Carpet is generally a fast surface, faster than hardcourt, with low bounce.[7]
The stiffest graphite racket that has been sold is the Prince More Game MP, which is rated at 80 RA on the industry-standard Babolat measuring equipment. The Prince More series used two pieces (a top side and bottom side of the racket, or a left side and a right side) and no grommet strip. Prince had briefly used a design without a grommet strip in an early version of its "original" graphite oversize. The most famous user of a More series racket was Martina Navratilova, who returned to play doubles in her 40s, using a Prince More Control DB (a midplus) for her initial wins in the mixed doubles at Wimbledon and the Australian Open with Leander Paes. She had used the stiffer More Game MP prior. Navratilova later switched to a design by Warren Bosworth (the founder of Bosworth Tennis) which had a customized asymmetric grip and an unusual geometric head shape. Stiffer rackets typically offer more power and control at the expense of increased ball shock, which can lead to injury or tennis elbow aggravation. Typically, power and control are at odds. However, in the case of stiff rackets, less energy is dissipated by the racket deforming, transmitting it back to the ball. Control is improved because there is less deformation. However, a player's overall power level may decrease due to the need to moderate ball striking effort to reduce discomfort and even injury. Although known as a hard hitter in her younger years, in her 40s she was known more as a precision player who used finesse (and especially tactics) more than power. In fact, the last doubles partner she won a major with in mixed, Bob Bryan, remarked on how slow her serve was, despite how effective she was on the court. Navratilova also used string that was much softer than what anyone else on tour used (thick uncoated natural gut), to help compensate for the stiffness of her racket. The vastly higher injury rate in tennis (when compared with the wood era) is, in part, due to the increase in stiffness, both of the racket and of the strings.
While traditional sets continue until a player wins at least six games by a margin of at least two games there are some alternative set scoring formats in use. A common alternative set format is the eight or nine game pro set. Instead of playing until one player reaches six games with a margin of two games, one plays until one player wins eight or nine games with a margin of two games. A tie-break is then played at eight or nine games all. While the format is not used in modern professional matches or recognized by the ITF rules, it was supposedly used in early professional tours. It is commonly utilized in various amateur leagues and high school tennis as a shorter alternative to a best of three match, but longer than a traditional tie-break set. In addition, eight game pro sets were used during doubles for all Division I college dual matches, until the 2014–2015 season.[31]
The server’s score is always announced first. So, for instance if the server has two points and his opponent, the receiver, has none, the score is 30-love. If a game is tied at 40-40, it is called “deuce”. If the server gets the next point, it’s called server advantage; if the receiver gets the next point, it’s called receiver advantage. It’s advantage because the player who has it only needs one more point to win. Should they not make this one point the game goes back to deuce. Scoring is perhaps a bit complicated, but necessary to understand as you learn to play tennis.
Tennis is played on a variety of surfaces and each surface has its own characteristics which affect the playing style of the game. There are four main types of courts depending on the materials used for the court surface: clay courts, hard courts, grass courts and carpet courts. The International Tennis Federation (ITF) lists different surfaces and properties and classifies surfaces into one of five pace settings:[5]
It is imagined that clock faces were used on court, with a quarter move of the hand to indicate a score of 15, 30, and 45. When the hand moved to 60, the game was over. However, in order to ensure that the game could not be won by a one-point difference in players' scores, the idea of "deuce" was introduced. To make the score stay within the "60" ticks on the clock face, the 45 was changed to 40. Therefore, if both players had 40, the first player to score would receive ten, and that would move the clock to 50. If the player scored a second time before the opponent is able to score, they would be awarded another ten and the clock would move to 60. The 60 signifies the end of the game. However, if a player fails to score twice in a row, then the clock would move back to 40 to establish another "deuce".[4][5]
Help: Tennis results service at Tennis 24 offers an ultimate tennis resource covering major tennis events as well as challengers and ITF tournaments. Tennis live scores and results are also provided with set results, H2H stats and other tennis live score information. Get live ATP tennis, live WTA tournaments, Challengers online, ITF tournaments and tennis team competitions - all at Tennis24.com.
Tennis balls were originally made of cloth strips stitched together with thread and stuffed with feathers.[44] Modern tennis balls are made of hollow vulcanized rubber with a felt coating. Traditionally white, the predominant colour was gradually changed to optic yellow in the latter part of the 20th century to allow for improved visibility. Tennis balls must conform to certain criteria for size, weight, deformation, and bounce to be approved for regulation play. The International Tennis Federation (ITF) defines the official diameter as 65.41–68.58 mm (2.575–2.700 in). Balls must weigh between 56.0 and 59.4 g (1.98 and 2.10 oz).[45] Tennis balls were traditionally manufactured in the United States and Europe. Although the process of producing the balls has remained virtually unchanged for the past 100 years, the majority of manufacturing now takes place in the Far East. The relocation is due to cheaper labour costs and materials in the region.[46] Tournaments that are played under the ITF Rules of Tennis must use balls that are approved by the International Tennis Federation (ITF) and be named on the official ITF list of approved tennis balls.[47]
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