A tennis match is composed of points, games, and sets. A set consists of a number of games (a minimum of six), which in turn each consist of points. A set is won by the first side to win 6 games, with a margin of at least 2 games over the other side (e.g. 6–3 or 7–5). If the set is tied at six games each, a tie-break is usually played to decide the set. A match is won when a player or a doubles team has won the majority of the prescribed number of sets. Matches employ either a best-of-three (first to two sets wins) or best-of-five (first to three sets wins) set format. The best-of-five set format is usually only used in the men's singles or doubles matches at Grand Slam and Davis Cup matches.
Hunter/Killer: This 11.7oz beefcake is what the attack-happy Novak Djokovic uses to great effect. It is made for speed with the weight distributed toward the ends so that it aids movement in any direction. The 18×20 string arrangement is unusual, but geared toward flat hitters who want to be able to aim their slams or throw a little english onto a powerful stroke. This is probably the best one you can find if you like to attack the net rather than hanging back at the baseline. The 100 square-inch head is a little on the large side for catching sneaky balls that would otherwise get by you. The racket is extremely stable and balanced when moving, but you’ll definitely catch a few bad vibrations as you use it. [Purchase: $186]

Tennis is played on a rectangular, flat surface. The court is 78 feet (23.77 m) long, and 27 feet (8.2 m) wide for singles matches and 36 ft (11 m) for doubles matches.[48] Additional clear space around the court is required in order for players to reach overrun balls. A net is stretched across the full width of the court, parallel with the baselines, dividing it into two equal ends. It is held up by either a metal cable or cord that can be no more than 0.8 cm (1⁄3 in).[49] The net is 3 feet 6 inches (1.07 m) high at the posts and 3 feet (0.91 m) high in the center.[48] The net posts are 3 feet (0.91 m) outside the doubles court on each side or, for a singles net, 3 feet (0.91 m) outside the singles court on each side.
One of the many types of affordable racquets available to you is a junior tennis racquet. These are designed primarily for younger players, and they come in relatively small sizes in order to accommodate these players. It's never too early to start learning and practicing tennis, and with junior racquets, people of all ages can get in on the fun. Not only are these items short in length, but they are also comprised of lightweight materials that allow for smooth, maneuverable motions when swinging. These racquets typically range in size from 19 inches to 26 inches. Even though these tennis items are meant to be used by younger players, a junior tennis racquet can be used by anyone who prefers the feel of a smaller racquet.
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Popular lawn tennis rackets vary primarily in length, weight, balance point, stiffness, beam thickness, string pattern, string density, and head size. They generally conform to unofficial standards that differ from past rackets. Currently, almost all adult rackets produced by companies such as Prince Sports, Yonex, Wilson, Babolat , Dunlop Sport, Head, Tecnifibre, and Völkl are made from a graphite composite. Those made from wood (the original racket frame row material), steel, fiberglass, aluminium are considered obsolete, although those materials are technically legal for play. Inexpensive rackets often have poor performance characteristics such as excessive flexibility and inadequate weight. No recent manufacturers use single-throated beams, although Prince tried to reintroduce the single throat design in the 1990s: the only professional who used one was Mirjana Lučić. Braided graphite rackets were considered high-end until recently and molded rackets have been the norm for some time. Molding is less expensive to manufacture and offer high stiffness. Dunlop started the transition away from aluminum based frames and popularised graphite-based racquets. Especially the Dunlop Max 200G model, once used to great effect by Steffi Graf and John McEnroe set the tone. Graphite-composite rackets are today's industry standard in professional tennis.
Takes All Comers: Since most of the best tennis rackets run in the $200 range, we wanted to give the entry-level buyer something that would give them quality and control without ruining their budget. Prince rackets generally cater to a slightly less affluent clientele, but they still make incredible, versatile stuff for the price. Their original Red is a great place to start. No matter what kind of play style you have, the large sweet spot sunk into the friendly 105 square-inch head is a bargain at twice the price. The 9.9oz weight works well for anyone with tennis elbow or the casual player who needs to adjust to moving a racket around. Whether you are a baseliner needing speed and power or a net player that wants size, the Red is a very solid, if not particularly flashy or sexy choice. [Purchase: $80]

I accept your thesis — kids & adults learn tennis differently. But there’s a corrolary: As someone who began tennis 10 yerars ago as a retirement activity, I’m confronted by others in my over-70 age group who — I swear — began hitting tennis balls before they could walk. There’s no way I can catch up with them. Should I give up, & just play with others “at my level”? [This is a serious question.] Or should I attempt one-person drills with the aim of improving?

To promote her works to American audiences, Lorde held her first US show at Le Poisson Rouge in New York on 6 August 2013 and performed "Tennis Court" among songs from The Love Club EP.[75] She subsequently included the song on the set list for her debut concert Pure Heroine Tour, which ran from late 2013 throughout 2014 in support of her debut studio album.[76][77] On 13 November 2013, Lorde performed "Tennis Court" among five other songs from The Love Club and Pure Heroine on Live on Letterman.[78] Six days later, Lorde held her first UK concert at Soho, London, where she performed several tracks from Pure Heroine including "Tennis Court".[79] She also performed the track during the "Almost Acoustic Christmas" event on KROQ-FM radio station on 9 December.[80]
The player who would normally be serving after 6–6 is the one to serve first in the tiebreak, and the tiebreak is considered a service game for this player. The server begins his or her service from the deuce court and serves one point. After the first point, the serve changes to the first server's opponent. Each player then serves two consecutive points for the remainder of the tiebreak. The first of each two-point sequence starts from the server's advantage court and the second starts from the deuce court. In this way, the sum of the scores is even when the server serves from the deuce court. After every six points, the players switch ends of the court; note that the side-changes during the tiebreak will occur in the middle of a server's two-point sequence. At the end of the tiebreak, the players switch ends of the court again, since the set score is always odd (13 games).

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So, a lot of people are very competitive in everything they try. They want to have the best business if they get into it, they want to be the best at their job when they get it, etc. If you are that sort of person and you look for excellence in your game but do not want to commit professionally to this then it is going to take an upwards of 5-10 years to play at some decent level like club level or USTA sponsored tournaments.
Historians believe that the game's ancient origin lay in 12th century northern France, where a ball was struck with the palm of the hand.[2] Louis X of France was a keen player of jeu de paume ("game of the palm"), which evolved into real tennis, and became notable as the first person to construct indoor tennis courts in the modern style. Louis was unhappy with playing tennis outdoors and accordingly had indoor, enclosed courts made in Paris "around the end of the 13th century".[3] In due course this design spread across royal palaces all over Europe.[3] In June 1316 at Vincennes, Val-de-Marne and following a particularly exhausting game, Louis drank a large quantity of cooled wine and subsequently died of either pneumonia or pleurisy, although there was also suspicion of poisoning.[4] Because of the contemporary accounts of his death, Louis X is history's first tennis player known by name.[4] Another of the early enthusiasts of the game was King Charles V of France, who had a court set up at the Louvre Palace.[5]
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