"Tennis Court" is a song recorded by New Zealand singer Lorde. She co-wrote the song with Joel Little, with production handled by the latter. Universal Music Group (UMG) released the song as the second single from her debut studio album Pure Heroine (2013) in Australia and New Zealand on 7 June 2013. On the same day, the label released an extended play (EP) of the same name containing three additional tracks throughout Europe. "Tennis Court" combines alternative pop, art pop and downtempo music with hip hop elements and incorporates minimalist production with simple synthesiser instrumentation and an electronic pulse. Inspired by Lorde's fresh insights into the music industry, the lyrics address Lorde's newfound fame and nostalgia for her hometown.
Best for Beginners: All right, most beginners aren’t going to want to drop $200 on a racket, but if you want something that is very forgiving no matter what type of player you are or what type of player you want to become. The overall feel is very plush, though it bears a deceptively high stiffness rating. It’s friendly with spin and minimizes how many of your shots go rogue over the fence. It allows you to move from power hitting to finesse games with ease and gives you a chance to find what feels best without pressuring you in one direction or another. Especially kind to off-center hits the 99.5 square-inch head gives you plenty of real estate for while the 11.3 oz weight makes it good for quickdraws. [Purchase: $190]
Tennis live on Scoreboard.com - tennis scores, results, livescore, draws and statistics. Scoreboard.com offers scores service from more than 2000 tennis competitions from around the world - ATP tournaments, WTA tour, challengers, ITF tournaments and also team competitions - Davis Cup and Fed Cup. Follow ATP and WTA matches point by point! You will find the "Point by point” tab with highlighted lost serves, break points, set- and match points in match details of all ATP and WTA matches.
Upon completion of The Love Club, Lorde and Little quickly collaborated again, initially planning to release another EP. The pair recorded materials at Little's Golden Age Studios in Morningside and started writing "Tennis Court" in January 2013.[5] They also recorded several additional tracks and ultimately decided to work on a full-length studio album instead.[4] Little acted as the song's sole producer, using audio software Pro Tools.[6] Songwriting for "Tennis Court" was different from how Lorde usually writes songs; by and large, she would have a lyric forming before going into the studio to record. For this song, Little and Lorde first wrote the music and the beat, and the lyrics were built on the instant instrumental.[7] Speaking to Billboard in November 2013, Little appreciated Lorde's developed songwriting skills on "Tennis Court", for which the singer wrote the melody and the whole chorus, praising her as "an amazing songwriter".[8]
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The most common causes for that are actually the coaches themselves because they only correct technique rather than involve players in various drills that would take their attention off their body and make them focus on tasks like reading the incoming ball, improving timing and rhythm, improving the feel for the strokes, hitting targets on the court, working on tactics like making opponents run, looking to wrong foot the opponent, and so on.
It is imagined that clock faces were used on court, with a quarter move of the hand to indicate a score of 15, 30, and 45. When the hand moved to 60, the game was over. However, in order to ensure that the game could not be won by a one-point difference in players' scores, the idea of "deuce" was introduced. To make the score stay within the "60" ticks on the clock face, the 45 was changed to 40. Therefore, if both players had 40, the first player to score would receive ten, and that would move the clock to 50. If the player scored a second time before the opponent is able to score, they would be awarded another ten and the clock would move to 60. The 60 signifies the end of the game. However, if a player fails to score twice in a row, then the clock would move back to 40 to establish another "deuce".[4][5]
In 2019, the Australian Open introduced a "super-tiebreak" for singles in the final set, replacing the previous format in which the final set would continue until one player was ahead by two games. The new format for the final set is similar to the "12-point tiebreaker", but with the winner being the first to 10 points instead of 7 (and they must still win by 2 points).[27] Tennis Australia has called this a "10-point tiebreak", though this is inconsistent with the reasoning behind the naming of the "12-point tiebreaker", which represents the minimum total number of points (a score of 7–5); the same reasoning would make the new format an "18-point tiebreaker" with a minimum winning score of 10–8.[28]
Baseline Battler: This is top spin guru Rafael Nadal’s racket of choice. It has a very stiff body that allows for better ball feel on each hit and can help improve control for those looking to tighten up their game. Aero is still using their wing shaft design in conjunction with an 11.2oz weight for fast speed both from the back court and for quick exchanges at the net. It has a 100 square-inch head with a nice, big sweet spot which makes is good for players of any experience level. While you’ll be able to move the ball with precision, you can also really flatten it out. Even from deep in the back court you can rack up some fairly vicious speed to cut your opponent off at the knees. [Purchase: $194+]
The origins of the 15, 30, and 40 scores are believed to be medieval French. The earliest reference is in a ballad by Charles D'Orleans in 1435 which refers to quarante cinque ("forty-five"), which gave rise to modern 40. In 1522 there is a sentence in Latin "we are winning 30, we are winning 45". The first recorded theories about the origin of 15 were published in 1555 and 1579. However, the origins of this convention remain obscure.[3]
Mark Beede is a USPTA, PTR, and ATPCA certified tennis coach, manager, and educator. Born and raised in Maine, USA, Beede received his undergraduate degree from Brandeis University and law degree from the University Of Maine School Of Law. After practicing law for sixteen years, Mark changed careers to tennis and moved to Hawaii to work with the USTA–Hawaii Pacific section and the Hawaii Pacific Tennis Foundation. Beede then moved to Istanbul, Turkey, to work as director of coaching education and special projects with Gavin Hopper at his international academy of professional players and elite juniors. Beede has a grown daughter and ... View Profile
In a legal service, the ball travels over the net (without touching it) and into the diagonally opposite service box. If the ball hits the net but lands in the service box, this is a let or net service, which is void, and the server retakes that serve. The player can serve any number of let services in a point and they are always treated as voids and not as faults. A fault is a serve that falls long or wide of the service box, or does not clear the net. There is also a "foot fault", which occurs when a player's foot touches the baseline or an extension of the center mark before the ball is hit. If the second service is also a fault, the server double faults, and the receiver wins the point. However, if the serve is in, it is considered a legal service.
I have 21 years of tennis experience. I've been teaching for 9 years and I'm a USPTA certified professional. As a former scholarship player at FSU I know what it takes to develop students to reach the division 1 college level. My versatility to work with all ages, male or female, and all levels is what I believe to be one of my greatest strengths. I will provide a fun and comfortable tennis environment where the students goals will be identified and lessons will be purposeful towards reaching their goals in tennis. ... View Profile
The International Tennis Federation (ITF) conducts a junior tour that allows juniors to establish a world ranking and an Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) or Women's Tennis Association (WTA) ranking. Most juniors who enter the international circuit do so by progressing through ITF, Satellite, Future, and Challenger tournaments before entering the main circuit. The latter three circuits also have adults competing in them. Some juniors, however, such as Australian Lleyton Hewitt and Frenchman Gaël Monfils, have catapulted directly from the junior tour to the ATP tour by dominating the junior scene or by taking advantage of opportunities given to them to participate in professional tournaments.
^ Lorde (2013). Lyrical Influences (VEVO LIFT): Brought to You By McDonald's (video). VEVO/YouTube. Event occurs at 1:49. Retrieved 22 November 2013. I think my writing process with "Tennis Court" was quite different to how I normally write. Generally, I will have a lyric forming before I go into the studio. But with this one, we wrote the music and beat before we wrote anything lyrically
A tie-break set is played with the same rules as the advantage set, except that when the score is tied at 6–6, a tie-break game (or tiebreaker) is played. Typically, the tie-break game continues until one side has won seven points with a margin of two or more points. However, many tie-break games are played with different tiebreak point requirements, such as 8 or 10 points. Often, a 7-point tie-breaker is played when the set score is tied at 6–6 to determine who wins the set. If the tiebreak score gets to 6-6, then whichever player to win the best of two points wins the set. [19]

I was born in Colombia but lived all my life in Venezuela. I got a tennis scholarship at Oklahoma, where I got my bachelor degree in Psychology. I worked as head pro at Club Nautico De Maracaibo in Venezuela for 23 years where I made lots of friends and made a lots of great players! 8 players I have taught played tennis for colleges here in the USA. I am a real friendly person and very serious about tennis. Sincerely yours, Jose
The ITF's Play and Stay campaign promotes playing on smaller courts with slower red, orange and green balls for younger children. This gives children more time and control so they can serve, rally, and score from the first lesson on courts that are sized to fit their bodies. The ITF has mandated that official competition for children under 10 years of age should be played on "Orange" courts 18 m (59 ft) long by 6.4 m (21 ft) wide. Competition for children under 8 years is played on "Red" courts that are 11 m (36 ft) long and 5.5 m (18 ft) wide. The net is always 0.8 m high in the center.[4]
Both color coatings and cushioned surfacing systems come in an array of colors, allowing you to branch out from the traditional green court surface and use nearly any color or combination of colors you choose on your backyard tennis court. While there is no "regulation" color scheme for tennis courts, some colors work better under certain conditions.
For our TW testers, this new version is not as comfortable as the DR: it is much firmer, especially on the upper part. On the positive side, the majority of the team was able to play effectively thanks to the EZONE 98 (305 g). Although it poses a bit of a control problem, this racquet offers more power and spin than the previous version, making it more dangerous on powerful hits.
Another benefit of post-tensioning is that contractors can build larger slabs using thinner concrete sections, and they don't have to install control joints which can interfere with play. "In order to build a reinforced concrete court that has the same structural capabilities as a post-tensioned court, we would have to install so much steel and concrete that the reinforced court would actually cost more," says Kolkmann. "Also, a reinforced court needs control joints, usually at a spacing of 10 to 15 feet, including in the playing area. Eventually these joints may widen, as well as any cracks that appear."

The International Tennis Federation (ITF) conducts a junior tour that allows juniors to establish a world ranking and an Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) or Women's Tennis Association (WTA) ranking. Most juniors who enter the international circuit do so by progressing through ITF, Satellite, Future, and Challenger tournaments before entering the main circuit. The latter three circuits also have adults competing in them. Some juniors, however, such as Australian Lleyton Hewitt and Frenchman Gaël Monfils, have catapulted directly from the junior tour to the ATP tour by dominating the junior scene or by taking advantage of opportunities given to them to participate in professional tournaments.


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When shopping for a tennis racquet, decide whether you are looking for a pre-strung racquet or an unstrung racquet. Pre-strung tennis racquets are a good choice for most beginner and intermediate players, as they are highly versatile and allow you to focus on the fundamentals without added complexity. Advanced players often prefer an unstrung racquet, which allows them to tailor the string type and tension to their swing and playing style.
In standard play, scoring beyond a "deuce" score, in which both players have scored three points each, requires that one player must get two points ahead in order to win the game. This type of tennis scoring is known as "advantage scoring" (or "ads"). The side which wins the next point after deuce is said to have the advantage. If they lose the next point, the score is again deuce, since the score is tied. If the side with the advantage wins the next point, that side has won the game, since they have a lead of two points. When the server is the player with the advantage, the score may be called as "advantage in". When the server's opponent has the advantage, the score may be called as "advantage out". These phrases are sometimes shortened to "ad in" or "van in" (or "my ad") and "ad out" (or "your ad"). Alternatively, the players' names are used: in professional tournaments the umpire announces the score in this format (e.g. "advantage Nadal" or "advantage Williams").
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Mark Beede is a USPTA, PTR, and ATPCA certified tennis coach, manager, and educator. Born and raised in Maine, USA, Beede received his undergraduate degree from Brandeis University and law degree from the University Of Maine School Of Law. After practicing law for sixteen years, Mark changed careers to tennis and moved to Hawaii to work with the USTA–Hawaii Pacific section and the Hawaii Pacific Tennis Foundation. Beede then moved to Istanbul, Turkey, to work as director of coaching education and special projects with Gavin Hopper at his international academy of professional players and elite juniors. Beede has a grown daughter and ... View Profile
Advanced players improve their performance through a number of accoutrements. Vibration dampeners may be interlaced in the proximal part of the string array for improved feel. Racket handles may be customized with absorbent or rubber-like materials to improve the players' grip. Players often use sweat bands on their wrists to keep their hands dry and head bands or bandanas to keep the sweat out of their eyes as well. Finally, although the game can be played in a variety of shoes, specialized tennis shoes have wide, flat soles for stability and a built-up front structure to avoid excess wear.
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