Hard courts are made of uniform rigid material, often covered with an acrylic surface layer[7] to offer greater consistency of bounce than other outdoor surfaces.[8] Hard courts can vary in speed, though they are faster than clay but not as fast as grass courts. The quantity of sand added to the paint can greatly affect the rate at which the ball slows down.[9]
We also slide the non-dominant hand from the throat down to the handle while we’re changing the grip. This somewhat complex move has to be practiced for a while so that it becomes quick and eventually completely subconscious. From there, we again let the racquet drop and fall behind us. Then we pull it through the familiar contact point and follow-through stages that we already mastered.
I have been teaching Tennis for over 30 years.Started playing from I was 11 years old in Jamaica, at 13 was under 14 & 16 Champion, was Junior Caribbean Open Champion. Competed in Orange Bowl in 1972 Competed in Junior Wimbledon in 1973 Won the Edgar Redwin Sportsmanship Award over several years. Youngest Ever All Jamaica Ladies Open Champion at 15. Also won Caribbean Ladies Open Champion in Singles, Doubles & Mixed Doubles. Was Coached by Harry Hopman ,traveled extensively on The WTA Tour competing on the "Avon Circuit," in the " French, Wimbledon & US Open Grand Slam Events." Played U.S. Clay Courts as well as Open events in Hong K ... View Profile
Hi I'm Decio Gomes I'm from Brasil leaving here in USA 20years  i pmayed tennis competitive until my 25yrs after that I start to coach players in the tour for 10yrs  after that I started to teach young players and club tennis I'm usta certified ITF coach certified and I'm master in PE  here in Miami I'm coaching high school for 6 years  and ladies teams all levels....bottom line I love  be at tennis court teaching that's my passion  ... View Profile
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The official music video for "Tennis Court" was directed by Joel Kefali, who previously worked with Lorde on the accompanying video for her debut single "Royals".[70] The video was filmed as a one-shot.[71] Lorde appears in "black clothing, braided hair, and dark lipstick."[71] It features Lorde staring into the camera as the song plays; she does not lip sync the lyrics except for the word "Yeah!" after each verse and during the chorus.[71][72] The set lighting fades in and out throughout the video.[73]
As rackets have become lighter, stiffer, and larger-headed, the professional game has moved, basically completely, from softer and more flexible string materials to stiff materials. This is, in large part, to tone down the additional power potential of the "modern" rackets. However, it also is related to the tendency for different string materials to move out of place when subjected to heavy topspin strokes. Polyester is the string of choice today because of that resistance, despite its increased stiffness (harsher feel and more aggravating for the joints) and reduced tension-holding ability (versus a string like natural gut, which excels at that). The top professionals of the 1970s and earlier, despite having access to stiffer materials such as nylon, nearly always chose to use the very flexible natural gut instead. String bed stiffness can be increased by using stiffer materials, such as kevlar and polyester, by increasing the density of the string pattern, and by stringing with a higher tension. Racket makers and players have experimented with very dense string patterns and very "open" patterns, beginning with the Snauwaert Hi Ten, which had a pattern with as few as 12 mains and 13 crosses. Doubles great Mark Woodforde used one of them.[14] More recently, Grigor Dimitrov is known for having played with a very open-patterned racket during part of his career. String choice, both in thickness and material, string tension, string pattern, and string pattern density can have a very large effect on how a racket performs.

A tennis match is composed of points, games, and sets. A set consists of a number of games (a minimum of six), which in turn each consist of points. A set is won by the first side to win 6 games, with a margin of at least 2 games over the other side (e.g. 6–3 or 7–5). If the set is tied at six games each, a tie-break is usually played to decide the set. A match is won when a player or a doubles team has won the majority of the prescribed number of sets. Matches employ either a best-of-three (first to two sets wins) or best-of-five (first to three sets wins) set format. The best-of-five set format is usually only used in the men's singles or doubles matches at Grand Slam and Davis Cup matches.
The rules of modern tennis have changed little since the 1890s. Two exceptions are that from 1908 to 1961 the server had to keep one foot on the ground at all times, and the adoption of the tiebreak in the 1970s. A recent addition to professional tennis has been the adoption of electronic review technology coupled with a point-challenge system, which allows a player to contest the line call of a point, a system known as Hawk-Eye.
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