We specialize in adult tennis lessons for young professionals in their 20's and 30s living in Miami.  We have the complete pathway for adults who want to learn tennis and meet new friends including: Novice, Intermediate and Advanced level programs. See Our Class Schedule Here: http://www.backhand-city.com/group_lessons/lesson_series Our classes also feature a social component to our lesson series and included in your purchase as we head out for drinks after class.   Players who join our classes also get on our email newsletter which offers things to do and place to play in and around the Miami tennis community. Get ready to imm ... View Profile

Tournaments are often organized by gender and number of players. Common tournament configurations include men's singles, women's singles, and doubles, where two players play on each side of the net. Tournaments may be organized for specific age groups, with upper age limits for youth and lower age limits for senior players. Example of this include the Orange Bowl and Les Petits As junior tournaments. There are also tournaments for players with disabilities, such as wheelchair tennis and deaf tennis.[81] In the four Grand Slam tournaments, the singles draws are limited to 128 players for each gender.

We’ve now covered scoring, the first step to learn as a tennis beginner — let’s move on to understanding the court. A tennis court is 78 feet long by 27 feet wide, and divided in half length-wise by the net. At each end of the court, there are white baselines — here, the serves are taken. These are also the out-of-bounds lines — a ball must not bounce beyond them or it’s out and the player who hit the ball loses a point.
But would if it’s a doubles game? How do I learn to play tennis then, you wonder?! Who serves? With doubles, the serving position rotates across teams and partners. For instance, if team partners A and B were playing doubles with team partners C and D, partner A would serve first and then it would rotate to partner C and then back to partner B and finally to partner D.
The rules of modern tennis have changed little since the 1890s. Two exceptions are that from 1908 to 1961 the server had to keep one foot on the ground at all times, and the adoption of the tiebreak in the 1970s. A recent addition to professional tennis has been the adoption of electronic review technology coupled with a point-challenge system, which allows a player to contest the line call of a point, a system known as Hawk-Eye.
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