If you learn to play tennis, it can be your first step toward a lifetime of fitness and pleasure. And now that we’ve discussed how to learn to play tennis with the basics, you’re ready to get out on the court. There’s no better way to learn to play tennis than with practice; with practice, you’ll not only learn to play tennis, you’ll learn to play tennis well.
This is a great question because it is so important to playing the game well. A grip size that is too small will cause your hand to slip on your racquet a little and a grip size that is too big will restrict your wrist movement and make it hard to adjust your grip as you play.To measure your grip you need to take out a measuring tape. Place your fingers on your hand extended out and together and then turn your palm up. With the measuring tape take a measurement from the very end of your ring finger down to the bottom crease in your palm (usually adjacent to where your thumb attaches to your palm). That will be the size grip you need to look for. It usually will fall between 4 inches and 4 ¾ inches on most people.Keep in mind that you may want to add a layer of grip tape to your new racquet like many people do. If you are one of those people then it is best to get a grip size that is one size smaller than what you measured your hand to be. This will allow for the extra grip tape without making the grip too big for your hand.
The drill went like this: He began feeding balls to me, rapidly, 20 or so a minute, to my left, to my right. They arrived close to my body at first, then farther away, then farther and harder. At the moment his racket was about to make contact with the ball, I did my split step, a reaction maneuver that entails hopping in place, spreading my legs shoulderwide and landing on my toes, ready. I stepped toward the net, taking the coming ball out of the air with a volley. Then I backpedaled once more to the T, volleying forehand, then backhand, forehand, backhand, on and on for three, four minutes — an eternity.

A break point occurs if the receiver, not the server, has a chance to win the game with the next point. Break points are of particular importance because serving is generally considered advantageous, with servers being expected to win games in which they are serving. A receiver who has one (score of 30–40 or advantage), two (score of 15–40) or three (score of love-40) consecutive chances to win the game has break point, double break point or triple break point, respectively. If the receiver does, in fact, win their break point, the game is awarded to the receiver, and the receiver is said to have converted their break point. If the receiver fails to win their break point it is called a failure to convert. Winning break points, and thus the game, is also referred to as breaking serve, as the receiver has disrupted, or broken the natural advantage of the server. If in the following game the previous server also wins a break point it is referred to as breaking back. Except where tie-breaks apply, at least one break of serve is required to win a set.
The tiebreak is sometimes not employed for the final set of a match and an advantage set is used instead. Therefore, the deciding set must be played until one player or team has won two more games than the opponent. Of the major tennis championships, this now only applies in the French Open. In the US Open, a tiebreak is played in the deciding set (fifth set for the men, third set for the women) at 6–6. Starting in 2019, in Wimbledon, a tiebreak will be played if the score reaches 12–12 in the final set. In the Australian Open, a "first to 10" tiebreak is played in the deciding set if it reaches 6–6.[20][21] (When the tiebreak was first introduced at Wimbledon in 1971, it was invoked at 8–8 rather than 6–6.) The US Open formerly held "Super Saturday" where the two men's semi-finals were played along with the women's final on the second Saturday of the event; therefore a tie-break was more prudent where player rest and scheduling is more important.
3. They often take only private lessons and play points when they play on their own – which means that they do not have enough repetitions in situations without pressure where they could automate their technique. In other words, they don’t practice enough – they only get more information in private lessons and do not groove the strokes in practice.

A frequent topic of discussion among tennis fans and commentators is who was the greatest male singles player of all time. By a large margin, an Associated Press poll in 1950 named Bill Tilden as the greatest player of the first half of the 20th century.[95] From 1920 to 1930, Tilden won singles titles at Wimbledon three times and the U.S. Championships seven times. In 1938, however, Donald Budge became the first person to win all four major singles titles during the same calendar year, the Grand Slam, and won six consecutive major titles in 1937 and 1938. Tilden called Budge "the finest player 365 days a year that ever lived."[96] In his 1979 autobiography, Jack Kramer said that, based on consistent play, Budge was the greatest player ever.[97] Some observers, however, also felt that Kramer deserved consideration for the title. Kramer was among the few who dominated amateur and professional tennis during the late 1940s and early 1950s. Tony Trabert has said that of the players he saw before the start of the open era, Kramer was the best male champion.[98]
The right tennis racquet for you is based largely upon your current skill level. Beginners tend to do well with large racquets because they have bigger sweet spots. Advanced players tend to want high-tech racquets made of composite materials for excellent power in a lighter weight. Your swing is another factor in the type of racquet you need. If you’re a powerful swinger, look for a smaller control racquet to help you have more control. If your swing is more about finesse, consider a larger power racquet to help you add a little oomph to your game.
Good Vibrations: Beginners need not apply with this oddly-shaped modern tennis racket. The 98 square-inch head has the same iconic – which is to say strange – shape that Yonex has been pushing for years, yet this one feels much more normal for intermediate and advanced players. The sweet spot is larger than usual, but still smaller than many choices. It’s a bit weighty at 11.5oz but Yonex seems to have used the extra weight to good effect with their Dual Shut System which uses the grommets near the handle to dampen bad vibrations for cleaner hits. It actually seems to come alive the harder you swing so it works well for playing an aggressive defense. While it shines against power hitters, trying to get the top spin to make a really heavy ball just won’t work. [Purchase: $199]
It is all based on how comfortable you are with the racket. If the racket works well with you, it is a good one. Are you hitting too many frames? Too many nets? Too many outs? Too many faults? No? then your racket is fine. Can you hit a good strong shot without the need for any strenuous effort on your part? Can you smash with the racket without your arm getting sore? Can you hit a nice serve with the right spin? If yes, you have a good racket.

Position yourself in a baseline corner. The game starts with both players on the baseline. The server chooses a corner of the baseline to serve from, and the other player positions themselves on the opposite back corner. So if you serve from the right corner of your side of the court, your opponent will stand in the far left corner from your point of view.[12]


Most large tournaments seed players, but players may also be matched by their skill level. According to how well a person does in sanctioned play, a player is given a rating that is adjusted periodically to maintain competitive matches. For example, the United States Tennis Association administers the National Tennis Rating Program (NTRP), which rates players between 1.0 and 7.0 in 1/2 point increments. Average club players under this system would rate 3.0–4.5 while world class players would be 7.0 on this scale.
Mark Beede is a USPTA, PTR, and ATPCA certified tennis coach, manager, and educator. Born and raised in Maine, USA, Beede received his undergraduate degree from Brandeis University and law degree from the University Of Maine School Of Law. After practicing law for sixteen years, Mark changed careers to tennis and moved to Hawaii to work with the USTA–Hawaii Pacific section and the Hawaii Pacific Tennis Foundation. Beede then moved to Istanbul, Turkey, to work as director of coaching education and special projects with Gavin Hopper at his international academy of professional players and elite juniors. Beede has a grown daughter and ... View Profile
Great question. Thanks for asking it. Gut string really is great for tennis players that know how to use spin and other shot variations to their advantage. It also deadens the ball more than most other strings will so it helps prevent mishits too.We do not feel there is a synthetic string out there that will give you quite as a dramatic effect but that is changing a little. Some of the new synthetic types of tennis racquet strings that are coming out are getting close to the quality of gut string. So if you look in tennis pro shops or in tennis specialty stores you might be able to find a synthetic racquet string that is to your liking.

The origin of the use of "love" for zero is also disputed. The most likely explanation is that it derives from the French expression for "the egg" (l'œuf) because an egg looks like the number zero.[8][9] This is similar to the origin of the term "duck" in cricket, supposedly from "duck's egg", referring to a batsman who has been called out without scoring a run. One possibility comes from the Dutch expression iets voor lof doen, which means to do something for praise, implying no monetary stakes.[10] Another theory on the origins of the use of "love" comes from the notion that, at the start of any match, when scores are at zero, players still have "love for each other".[11]
If you are beginner starting out you might have been scared by all the different complexities of the game and might have felt overwhelmed by them. You might be wondering that it takes a very very long time to achieve some sort of proficient level in this game. You will be surprised to know that tennis is a very awesome game and if you keep your level of play consistent and employ the right technique, you will be able to play at a pretty good level in no time at all compared to other sports.
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