3. They often take only private lessons and play points when they play on their own – which means that they do not have enough repetitions in situations without pressure where they could automate their technique. In other words, they don’t practice enough – they only get more information in private lessons and do not groove the strokes in practice.

Vibration dampeners (also sometimes known as "gummies") may be interlaced in the proximal part of the string array, to reduce the percussive sound of the ball hitting the strings and/or to reduce perceived vibration. They do not, however, reduce impact shock significantly, so they are of no safety value.[13] Some professionals, such as Andrei Agassi, used rubber bands instead of specialized dampeners. Dampeners come in two main types. The first uses the two central main strings to hold it in place. The second is sometimes called a "worm" and it is woven between many of the main strings. Dampeners are nearly always placed very near the bottom of the racket string bed.

Frame shows use seen as some scuffing/paint wear to the sides/edges as well as some play wear to the bumper guard, otherwise a solid racquet just needing some strings for play. (No cracks to the frame) See pics! Can zoom in for detail. The white grip shows some dark marks but is in good playable condition. (4 1/8") Returnable only if in unused original listing condition as pictured.


Earlier this summer, I got to half-watch him play just a couple of courts away from where I was playing. The club had arranged a set of doubles pitting Kirill and another young tennis instructor against two players from the Pelham High School tennis team who had recently won the state championship in doubles. The two of them, terrific teenage players, had been playing together for years; Kirill had had a hand in their development. So what I was mostly interested in, honestly, as dozens of club members gathered on the veranda of the tennis house to watch, was how Kirill would deal with this, what the etiquette was. Would he be nervous or restrained?
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This is the very big Turning point of my life. Now there is no Head coach in my academy so effect of no head coach is my Game is not building up any more days, weeks, Months even year passed but there is no improvement of My game I wanted to change the academy but Unfortunately it is not possible for me because the fees of My nearby academy is too high as compared to my current academy.
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I focus on the student ability to improve skills in the court by having constant repetitions of drills. I also make the lesson more attractive for the students by playing with them and make them experience real game practice.  I structure my lessons with short warm up continued by certain amount of drills and finally different games applied to different situations of the game. 
I too began tennis as a retirement activity at age 65. I am now 74 and have found that I can only play with people at my age and level. I get nothing from watching a young, experienced player smash the ball past me and standing in front of every shot I hit, no matter where I aim it. If you would like to correspond and chat and compare notes further, I am at alsal38@me.com. My name is Al Salganick.
You and your group of friends just started to play tennis just to have a little fun with it. You do not plan to compete or anything. Your main focus is to have fun and have a good time with your friends. You do not care about whether you have the proper technique or the form, you just want the ball to keep in play and have some long and exciting rallies with your group of friends.

The Tennis Complex (6 courts) is located on the north-west side of campus just behind Dedeaux Baseball Field.  Courts are open for general use during Lyon Center operating hours, however, Athletics and Physical Education take priority during the times listed below.  Please note that courts are washed on Friday mornings and lights will remain on 30 minutes after Lyon Center closing.  Two courts have been newly resurfaced with sport court material. This multi-purpose surface allows individuals to play tennis, soccer, floor hockey, volleyball and basketball.
For sure you can never go wrong purchasing any of the models we did tennis racquet reviews on in this article. They feature such things as excellent racquet grip size, large sweet spots and they also have many advanced technologies used in their construction. If you don’t like any of those models, then you should refer to the handy buying guide to help you in your new tennis racquet selection process.

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Tennis balls were originally made of cloth strips stitched together with thread and stuffed with feathers.[44] Modern tennis balls are made of hollow vulcanized rubber with a felt coating. Traditionally white, the predominant colour was gradually changed to optic yellow in the latter part of the 20th century to allow for improved visibility. Tennis balls must conform to certain criteria for size, weight, deformation, and bounce to be approved for regulation play. The International Tennis Federation (ITF) defines the official diameter as 65.41–68.58 mm (2.575–2.700 in). Balls must weigh between 56.0 and 59.4 g (1.98 and 2.10 oz).[45] Tennis balls were traditionally manufactured in the United States and Europe. Although the process of producing the balls has remained virtually unchanged for the past 100 years, the majority of manufacturing now takes place in the Far East. The relocation is due to cheaper labour costs and materials in the region.[46] Tournaments that are played under the ITF Rules of Tennis must use balls that are approved by the International Tennis Federation (ITF) and be named on the official ITF list of approved tennis balls.[47]
In 2019, the Australian Open introduced a "super-tiebreak" for singles in the final set, replacing the previous format in which the final set would continue until one player was ahead by two games. The new format for the final set is similar to the "12-point tiebreaker", but with the winner being the first to 10 points instead of 7 (and they must still win by 2 points).[27] Tennis Australia has called this a "10-point tiebreak", though this is inconsistent with the reasoning behind the naming of the "12-point tiebreaker", which represents the minimum total number of points (a score of 7–5); the same reasoning would make the new format an "18-point tiebreaker" with a minimum winning score of 10–8.[28]
You and your group of friends just started to play tennis just to have a little fun with it. You do not plan to compete or anything. Your main focus is to have fun and have a good time with your friends. You do not care about whether you have the proper technique or the form, you just want the ball to keep in play and have some long and exciting rallies with your group of friends.
The Royal Tennis Court later came to be revered around the first anniversary of 20 June 1789, a decisive date in the history of France and of democracy. In 1790, a bronze plaque bearing the text of the oath was presented to the National Assembly and then taken in a procession to Versailles and put up facing the entrance to the Real Tennis room. Originally a royal sports and entertainment room, it became home to a temple to the memory of the abolition of the monarchy. It was soon neglected, however, and became a national asset in 1793. In the absence of any maintenance, it was closed to the public five years later.
The ITF's Play and Stay campaign promotes playing on smaller courts with slower red, orange and green balls for younger children. This gives children more time and control so they can serve, rally, and score from the first lesson on courts that are sized to fit their bodies. The ITF has mandated that official competition for children under 10 years of age should be played on "Orange" courts 18 m (59 ft) long by 6.4 m (21 ft) wide. Competition for children under 8 years is played on "Red" courts that are 11 m (36 ft) long and 5.5 m (18 ft) wide. The net is always 0.8 m high in the center.[4]
The first thing to consider when looking at tennis racquets is the frame. You have many options when it comes to size, shape, material, and so on. A racquet with a larger head will help you make more powerful swings, whereas a smaller head affords you more control. Can’t decide? A mid-sized head offers a little of both! For length, a longer racquet can offer better leverage per swing for more power, but a traditional-length racquet provides a better balance of power and control. When considering the weight of a racquet, remember that heavier tennis racquets offer more power and less control while lighter racquets yield more control at the expense of power. The shape of your racquet determines where the sweet spot is: Traditional oval racquets have a sweet spot at the bottom, and a teardrop racquet features a larger sweet spot overall.

The stiffest graphite racket that has been sold is the Prince More Game MP, which is rated at 80 RA on the industry-standard Babolat measuring equipment. The Prince More series used two pieces (a top side and bottom side of the racket, or a left side and a right side) and no grommet strip. Prince had briefly used a design without a grommet strip in an early version of its "original" graphite oversize. The most famous user of a More series racket was Martina Navratilova, who returned to play doubles in her 40s, using a Prince More Control DB (a midplus) for her initial wins in the mixed doubles at Wimbledon and the Australian Open with Leander Paes. She had used the stiffer More Game MP prior. Navratilova later switched to a design by Warren Bosworth (the founder of Bosworth Tennis) which had a customized asymmetric grip and an unusual geometric head shape. Stiffer rackets typically offer more power and control at the expense of increased ball shock, which can lead to injury or tennis elbow aggravation. Typically, power and control are at odds. However, in the case of stiff rackets, less energy is dissipated by the racket deforming, transmitting it back to the ball. Control is improved because there is less deformation. However, a player's overall power level may decrease due to the need to moderate ball striking effort to reduce discomfort and even injury. Although known as a hard hitter in her younger years, in her 40s she was known more as a precision player who used finesse (and especially tactics) more than power. In fact, the last doubles partner she won a major with in mixed, Bob Bryan, remarked on how slow her serve was, despite how effective she was on the court. Navratilova also used string that was much softer than what anyone else on tour used (thick uncoated natural gut), to help compensate for the stiffness of her racket. The vastly higher injury rate in tennis (when compared with the wood era) is, in part, due to the increase in stiffness, both of the racket and of the strings.

Nearly one hundred years after its construction, the Royal Tennis Court became symbolic of the brewing French Revolution. On 20 June 1789, the deputies of the Third Estate met there at the time of the Estates General, since the Menus-Plaisirs hotel, their usual meeting place, had been closed by order of the king. On that day, they took an oath not to separate until they had endowed France with a written constitution. This founding scene was immortalised by the painter Jacques-Louis David in a grand fresco, sadly unfinished, called The Tennis Court Oath, which joined the Palace collections in 1921.
A game consists of a sequence of points played with the same player serving. A game is won by the first player to have won at least four points in total and at least two points more than the opponent. The running score of each game is described in a manner peculiar to tennis: scores from zero to three points are described as "love", "15", "30", and "40", respectively. If at least three points have been scored by each player, making the player's scores equal at 40 apiece, the score is not called out as "40–40", but rather as "deuce". If at least three points have been scored by each side and a player has one more point than his opponent, the score of the game is "advantage" for the player in the lead. During informal games, "advantage" can also be called "ad in" or "van in" when the serving player is ahead, and "ad out" or "van out" when the receiving player is ahead.

Notable tennis tournaments previously held on carpet courts were the WCT Finals, Paris Masters, U.S. Pro Indoor and Kremlin Cup. Since 2009, their use has been discontinued on the top tier of the ATP. ATP Challenger Tour tournaments such as the Trofeo Città di Brescia still use carpet courts. The WTA Tour has one remaining carpet court event, the International-level Tournoi de Québec.


Of the current four Grand Slam tournaments, the Australian and US Open use hard courts, French Open is played on clay, and Wimbledon, the only Grand Slam to have always been played on the same surface, is played on grass. The Australian Open switched from grass to hard courts in 1988 and in its early years the French championship alternated between clay and sand/rubble courts. The US Open is the only major to have been played on three surfaces; it was played on grass from its inception until 1974, clay from 1975 until 1977 and hard courts since it moved from the West Side Tennis Club to the National Tennis Center in 1978.
Pitchfork writer Lindsay Zoladz applauded the song's narrative for "exposing irony and even hypocrisy without coming off as preachy or moralistic".[50] On behalf of Consequence of Sound, Jon Hadusek selected the song as an "essential" track of Pure Heroine regarding its narrative lyrics portraying Lorde's songwriting that was "beyond her years".[46] Time Out editor Nick Levine similarly lauded Lorde's "compelling" songwriting ability despite her young age at the time and praised the song's composition as "glorious".[45] AllMusic's Stephen Thomas Erlewine and The Independent's Andy Gill also picked "Tennis Court" as a standout track of Pure Heroine,[51][52] while John Murphy from musicOMH complimented the track as "impossible not to sing along to".[53] In a less enthusiastic review, Evan Sawdey of PopMatters considered the song a "drawback" that does not "[suit] her well".[54]
OK. Now that you understand the court, let’s learn to play tennis with some specifics. As already mentioned, a tennis beginner can play a singles or doubles game with either one or two players on each side of the net. The game — and, each point — begins with a serve taken from behind the baseline. The ball must bounce into the diagonally opposite service court. (Your serve may be your most difficult stroke as you learn to play tennis.) The play — or point — continues until one player fails to hit the ball back or hits it out-of-bounds.
After the celebration of the centenary of the oath in 1889, the room was again forgotten and quickly deteriorated despite regular maintenance. Just before World War II there was even a plan to convert it into a table tennis room for Senate administrators at the Palace. In 1989 the bicentenary of the French Revolution constituted another opportunity to restore the room.
Each side of the court is lined with two white marks to indicate the width of the court for singles play and the larger width for doubles play. The short white line extending from the net to halfway down the court is the service court. As a tennis beginner, you can’t learn to play tennis without understanding these rules of the court. With ample practice time working on tennis strokes, the right tennis techniques may be in fact a element that can propel a tennis player allowing them to hit shots they never could with their old and inefficient tennis strokes. That means that all of the tennis strokes can be improved, the tennis forehand, backhand and serve are the three biggest tennis strokes in the modern game. All three tennis strokes are also incumbent upon having good tennis technique to make these tennis strokes work.

Frame shows use seen as some scuffing/paint wear to the sides/edges as well as some play wear to the bumper guard, otherwise a solid racquet just needing some strings for play. (No cracks to the frame) See pics! Can zoom in for detail. The white grip shows some dark marks but is in good playable condition. (4 1/8") Returnable only if in unused original listing condition as pictured.

As it happens, I was reading a ruefully captivating new memoir called “Swimming Studies,” by a onetime contender for the Canadian Olympic team, Leanne Shapton, which explores how growing up a competitive swimmer formed her habits of heart and mind. Years later, her daily rhythms and life choices, her nightly dreams, her understanding of duration, pleasure, pain and reward, remain informed by her hours in the training pool. Swimming strokes carved the contours of her inner life, and it’s not at all clear she is thankful for that. Of course, Andre Agassi, in his memoir, writes of how the aloneness of singles tennis — the very thing that imparted to Kirill a kind of Emersonian self-reliance, as he understands it — just enlarged his loneliness. You never know.
An advantage set is played until a player or team has won at least 6 games and that player or team has a 2-game lead over their opponent(s). The set continues, without tiebreak(er), until a player or team wins the set by 2 games. Advantage sets are no longer played under the rules of the United States Tennis Association,[17] nor in the Australian Open starting from 2019;[18] however, they are still used in the final sets in men's and women's singles in the French Open, Wimbledon, and Fed Cup. Mixed doubles at the Grand Slams (except for Wimbledon) are a best-of-three format with the final set being played as a "Super Tie Break" (sometimes referred to as a "best of two" format) except at Wimbledon, which still plays a best-of-three match with the final set played as an advantage set and the first two played as tie-break sets.

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Tennis is a wonderful sport. It is a great exercise for both the mind and the body and sometimes critics say that it is all a mind sport. Unlike many other sports, all the responsibility to perform well is on you. If you are not in the right mindset you probably will not get very far. While I do agree with this statement, a great athletic body definitely helps more often than not. Players like Rafael Nadal have used their extremely well-built bodies to become legends, they work on their bodies as much as they work on their minds. 
The tiebreak is sometimes not employed for the final set of a match and an advantage set is used instead. Therefore, the deciding set must be played until one player or team has won two more games than the opponent. Of the major tennis championships, this now only applies in the French Open. In the US Open, a tiebreak is played in the deciding set (fifth set for the men, third set for the women) at 6–6. Starting in 2019, in Wimbledon, a tiebreak will be played if the score reaches 12–12 in the final set. In the Australian Open, a "first to 10" tiebreak is played in the deciding set if it reaches 6–6.[20][21] (When the tiebreak was first introduced at Wimbledon in 1971, it was invoked at 8–8 rather than 6–6.) The US Open formerly held "Super Saturday" where the two men's semi-finals were played along with the women's final on the second Saturday of the event; therefore a tie-break was more prudent where player rest and scheduling is more important.

"Tennis Court" is written in the key of A minor and has a moderate tempo of 92 beats per minute. Lorde's vocal range on the song spans one octave, from G3 to G4.[22] As with Lorde's early releases, the song features a minimalist production, employing simple and sparse instrumentation.[23][24] It utilises reverbed synthesisers and an electronic pulse.[25] "Tennis Court" combines alternative pop, art pop and downtempo genres over hip hop-influenced beats.[26][27][28] Billboard editor Jason Lipshutz commented that "Tennis Court" conveys a darker aspect of pop music.[29] Nick Messtite from Forbes wrote that the track was reminiscent of The Postal Service's 2003 song "The District Sleeps Alone Tonight",[30] while Siân Rowe from NME compared the song to works by Lana Del Rey.[31] Clash's Joe Zadeh likened the electronic composition of "Tennis Court" to that of The xx's song "Together" from The Great Gatsby soundtrack (2013).[25]


You have my dad and brother’s name! Yes, I agree that tennis becomes very technical. I have also struggled with being too technique oriented with my kids. Thanks to Tomaz, I have used feel and imitation a lot more. I think many people in the US are plagued with the notion that faster is better. There is this sense that children should grow up faster and that learning more earlier is better. This turns into the mentality of winning now is better than playing as well as you can later. The two-handed backhand is an example of this. A younger player is much more likely to win with a two-handed backhand at a younger age. The one-hander is very difficult to learn and requires strength and very good footwork. But as I told a local pro I think there is also a downside. By using two forehands it allows people to “cheat” on both sides. My son recently switched to a one-hander just before turning thirteen. It’s hard but he now realizes how important footwork is and his forehand has gotten better because the steps he uses for his backhand have transferred to his forehand. But he is like an alien. He faces almost no other one-handed backhands in competition. So yes, tennis teaching becomes technical because the adult (pros) forget how to think like kids. They also tend to want success fast. Europeans seem to take a longer view. Maybe because their cultures are much older than the American culture.
A few heavy hitters like their tennis racquets to be a little top heavy so they generate more power when hitting a ball but that is usually the exception as opposed to the rule. In general, it is usually best to start out with a tennis racquet that is balanced; this is especially true if you are a novice player. A balanced racquet will give you a little more control as you swing at and strike a tennis ball.Things that can throw a tennis racquet’s balance off are such things as an oversized racquet head, extra padding on a handle and innovative racquet designs that purposely redistribute weight to a specific area. So be aware of this when you are shopping for your new tennis racquet.
It’s also important to consider the size and shape of the racquet head. Oversized and mid-plus sized heads have larger sweet spots, making it easier to hit the ball with power, while smaller head sizes allow for greater control. Tear-drop shaped heads also provide a larger sweet spot, while traditional oval heads are valued for their feel and control.
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For a right-handed player, the forehand is a stroke that begins on the right side of the body, continues across the body as contact is made with the ball, and ends on the left side of the body. There are various grips for executing the forehand, and their popularity has fluctuated over the years. The most important ones are the continental, the eastern, the semi-western, and the western. For a number of years, the small, frail 1920s player Bill Johnston was considered by many to have had the best forehand of all time, a stroke that he hit shoulder-high using a western grip. Few top players used the western grip after the 1920s, but in the latter part of the 20th century, as shot-making techniques and equipment changed radically, the western forehand made a strong comeback and is now used by many modern players. No matter which grip is used, most forehands are generally executed with one hand holding the racket, but there have been fine players with two-handed forehands. In the 1940s and 50s, the Ecuadorian/American player Pancho Segura used a two-handed forehand to achieve a devastating effect against larger, more powerful players. Players such as Monica Seles or France's Fabrice Santoro and Marion Bartoli are also notable players known for their two-handed forehands.[76]


Choosing the right tennis racquet is the best way to ensure optimal performance, aside from practice and matches. This is why we at Midwest Sports stocks such a mammoth collection. We want you to find the best racquet for your game. Select among technical options including head size, weight, and balance. Do you prefer comfort, control or power? You can also browse by price and brand.

The concrete slab should be placed at a thickness of at least 4 inches, or 5 inches if subject to repeated freeze/thaw cycles. Munson's post-tensioned slabs are a minimum of 5 inches thick, with the post-tensioning cables spaced 3 feet apart. Before installing the slab, Munson lays down two layers of 10-mil polyethylene sheeting to reduce drag as the slab shrinks upon curing and to serve as a moisture-vapor barrier.
For a right-handed player, the forehand is a stroke that begins on the right side of the body, continues across the body as contact is made with the ball, and ends on the left side of the body. There are various grips for executing the forehand, and their popularity has fluctuated over the years. The most important ones are the continental, the eastern, the semi-western, and the western. For a number of years, the small, frail 1920s player Bill Johnston was considered by many to have had the best forehand of all time, a stroke that he hit shoulder-high using a western grip. Few top players used the western grip after the 1920s, but in the latter part of the 20th century, as shot-making techniques and equipment changed radically, the western forehand made a strong comeback and is now used by many modern players. No matter which grip is used, most forehands are generally executed with one hand holding the racket, but there have been fine players with two-handed forehands. In the 1940s and 50s, the Ecuadorian/American player Pancho Segura used a two-handed forehand to achieve a devastating effect against larger, more powerful players. Players such as Monica Seles or France's Fabrice Santoro and Marion Bartoli are also notable players known for their two-handed forehands.[76]

It wasn't until the 16th century that rackets came into use, and the game began to be called "tennis", from the French term tenez, which can be translated as "hold!", "receive!" or "take!", an interjection used as a call from the server to his opponent.[6] It was popular in England and France, although the game was only played indoors where the ball could be hit off the wall. Henry VIII of England was a big fan of this game, which is now known as real tennis.[7] During the 18th and early 19th centuries, as real tennis declined, new racket sports emerged in England.[8]

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