The server’s score is always announced first. So, for instance if the server has two points and his opponent, the receiver, has none, the score is 30-love. If a game is tied at 40-40, it is called “deuce”. If the server gets the next point, it’s called server advantage; if the receiver gets the next point, it’s called receiver advantage. It’s advantage because the player who has it only needs one more point to win. Should they not make this one point the game goes back to deuce. Scoring is perhaps a bit complicated, but necessary to understand as you learn to play tennis.
By 1975, aluminum construction improvements allowed for the introduction of the first American "oversized" racket, which was manufactured by Weed. Prince popularized the oversize racket, which had a head size of approximately 110 square inches (710 cm2). Howard Head was able to obtain a broad patent for Prince, despite the prior art of the Bentley Fortissimo (the first oversize, made in Germany of fiberglass) and the Weed. The patent was rejected by Germany but approved in the USA. The popularity of the Prince aluminum oversize had the side effect of popularizing rackets having other non-standard head sizes such as mid-size 85–90 square inches (550–580 cm2) and mid-plus sizes 95–98 square inches (610–630 cm2). Fairly quickly, midsize frames began to become the most-used frames in the pro tours. Martina Navratilova popularized the midsize graphite racket, with her wins using the Yonex R-7, the first midsize graphite racket made by Yonex. Nearly at the same time, however, she said the "jumbo" rackets (midsize included) should be removed from the sport for making it easier. She said she would use them only because other players could, as they were tournament-legal. Fewer players chose to use oversize rackets, and some switched to midplus frames after their earliest career for more control. Fiberglass frames also had a brief period of limited popularity, making fewer inroads among top players than aluminum. Also, the earliest composites, such as the Head Competition series, used by Arthur Ashe, were made without graphite. These were more flexible than a typical early graphite composite but stiffer than wood, fiberglass, and aluminum.
Well, hopefully, this article has helped you learn more about tennis racquets than you knew before you started reading it. Tennis racquets and the technology behind them really are much more complicated than most people think. If you use the information we provided you here in the right way it will really help you very much when you go to purchase your new tennis racquet. It helps you to be well informed when you are trying to find the best tennis racquet for you.
Any information or materials you transmit, upload or otherwise submit to any USTA Family of Companies site (including, without limitation, comments, reviews, postings to chat, email messages or materials directed to any Forum, as the term is defined below) or any creative suggestions, ideas, notes, drawings, concepts or other information sent to the USTA via our Web site,  through any USTA social media page, app or other means of transmission or delivery, shall be collectively referred to as "Submissions." If you transmit or otherwise deliver Submissions to the USTA Family of Companies, you grant the USTA Family of Companies a nonexclusive, royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable (or the longest period permitted under law) license (with the right to sublicense and assign) to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, publicly perform and display, transmit, make, sell, create derivative works from and distribute such Submissions or incorporate such Submissions into other works in any form or medium and through any means or modes of distribution or technology now known or hereafter developed. You hereby agree and represent to the USTA Family of Companies that you own or have been granted the necessary intellectual property and other rights in the Submissions (including, without limitation, a waiver of any applicable moral rights) to grant such license to the USTA Family of Companies, that no such Submissions are, or shall be, subject to any obligation of confidence on the part of the USTA Family of Companies and that the USTA Family of Companies shall not be liable for any use or disclosure of any Submissions. Without limitation of the foregoing, the USTA Family of Companies shall be entitled to unrestricted use of the Submissions for any purpose whatsoever, commercial or otherwise, without compensation to the provider of the Submissions. You agree that no Submission made by you will contain libelous, abusive, obscene or otherwise unlawful material and you acknowledge and agree that you are exclusively liable for the content of any Submission made by you.
I accept your thesis — kids & adults learn tennis differently. But there’s a corrolary: As someone who began tennis 10 yerars ago as a retirement activity, I’m confronted by others in my over-70 age group who — I swear — began hitting tennis balls before they could walk. There’s no way I can catch up with them. Should I give up, & just play with others “at my level”? [This is a serious question.] Or should I attempt one-person drills with the aim of improving?

A game consists of a sequence of points played with the same player serving, and is won by the first side to have won at least four points with a margin of two points or more over their opponent. Normally the server's score is always called first and the receiver's score second. Score calling in tennis is unusual in that (except in tie-breaks) each point has a corresponding call that is different from its point value. The current point score is announced orally before each point by the judge, or by the server if there is no judge.


This really depends on your experience level to be truthful. Many pro players will buy a racket they like and then get it strung with a particular type of string that they like.We don’t really recommend that for the average player. First, do a little string research, then get a racquet that is already strung with a type of string that you think will work well for your playing style. Remember, you can always restring your racquet later if you are not happy with it.

In order to access some of the services, applications or sweepstakes offered by the USTA, you may be required to register and/or provide personal information, such as name, email, telephone number and birthdate (“Registration Data”).  Although information may be required to participate in certain activities or promotions, participants provide that information voluntarily. The USTA adheres to strict data management protocols. Those protocols vary based on the category of participation with USTA.
The dimensions of a tennis court are defined and regulated by the International Tennis Federation (ITF) governing body and are written down in the annual 'Rules of Tennis' document.[1] The court is 78 feet (23.77 metres) long. Its width is 27 feet (8.23 metres) for singles matches and 36 feet (10.97 metres) for doubles matches.[2] The service line is 21 feet (6.40 metres) from the net.[2] Additional clear space around the court is needed in order for players to reach overrun balls for a total of 60 feet (18 metres) wide and 120 feet (37 metres) long. A net is stretched across the full width of the court, parallel with the baselines, dividing it into two equal ends. The net is 3 feet 6 inches (1.07 metres) high at the posts, and 3 feet (0.91 metres) high in the center.[3] The net posts are 3 feet (0.91 metres) outside the doubles court on each side or, for a singles net, 3 feet (0.91 metres) outside the singles court on each side.
Kolkmann stresses the importance of taking no shortcuts during the preparation phases. "For our courts, we require at least a 10-inch stone base over a geotextile fabric. We use 6 to 8 inches of clear stone [screened and washed limestone used as a drainage medium] and then a 2- to 4-inch lift of 3/4-inch minus stone. The entire court is surrounded by 4-inch drain tile to reduce the amount of surface and subsurface water that gets under a court. The lift of clear stone also allows the water to drain under the court much faster, should any get underneath. All the stone is laser-graded to the correct slope."
Further, the patenting of the first lawn mower in 1830, in Britain, is strongly believed to have been the catalyst, worldwide, for the preparation of modern-style grass courts, sporting ovals, playing fields, pitches, greens, etc. This in turn led to the codification of modern rules for many sports, including lawn tennis, most football codes, lawn bowls and others.[9]
×