The standard ProCushion System consists of 1 to 2 coats of Acrylic Resurfacer, 3 coats of CushionMaster™ II, 2 coats of CushionMaster™ I, and 2 coats of CushionMaster™ Neutral Base with ColorPlus™ Pigment Dispersion. SportMaster Color Concentrate or the SportMaster ColorPlus™ System may be substituted for the CushionMaster™ Neutral Base tennis court surfaces. (This is the standard system installation. Custom levels of cushion can also be achieved by adding or removing layers. Contact a SportMaster representative for details.)
Your swing style is another important factor to consider when shopping for tennis racquets. If you have a fast and long swing, you are likely able to provide all the power you need and may want to consider a racquet with a mid or mid-plus head, which can help you control your shot. If you have a shorter and slower swing, an oversized racquet head may be a better choice as it can increase the power of your shot.
Consider a player who wins six games in each of two sets, all by a score of game–30. The winner has scored 4×12 = 48 points and the loser 2×12 = 24. Suppose also that the loser wins four games in each set, all by a score of game-love. The loser has scored 4×8 = 32 points and the winner zero in those games. The final score is a win by 6–4, 6–4; total points 48–56.
In Tennis: A Cultural History, Heiner Gillmeister reveals that on December 8, 1874, British army officer Walter Clopton Wingfield wrote to Harry Gem, commenting that he (Wingfield) had been experimenting with his version of lawn tennis “for a year and a half”.[13] In December 1873, Wingfield designed and patented a game which he called sphairistikè (Greek: σφαιριστική, meaning "ball-playing"), and was soon known simply as "sticky" – for the amusement of guests at a garden party on his friend's estate of Nantclwyd Hall, in Llanelidan, Wales.[14] According to R. D. C. Evans, turfgrass agronomist, "Sports historians all agree that [Wingfield] deserves much of the credit for the development of modern tennis."[8][15] According to Honor Godfrey, museum curator at Wimbledon, Wingfield "popularized this game enormously. He produced a boxed set which included a net, poles, rackets, balls for playing the game – and most importantly you had his rules. He was absolutely terrific at marketing and he sent his game all over the world. He had very good connections with the clergy, the law profession, and the aristocracy and he sent thousands of sets out in the first year or so, in 1874."[16] The world's oldest annual tennis tournament took place at Leamington Lawn Tennis Club in Birmingham in 1874.[17] This was three years before the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club would hold its first championships at Wimbledon, in 1877. The first Championships culminated a significant debate on how to standardize the rules.[16]
In order to assist litigants and attorneys using the Shreveport City Court, the court has created a Guide to Practice. This document is not meant to be a definitive statement of the law nor may it be cited to the court as support for any position. This document is merely a tool to be utilized to assist litigants and attorneys in access to the court. Legal citations are provided to assist litigants and attorneys in their quest to determine applicable law and procedure.
Van Alen called his innovation a "tiebreaker", and he actually proposed two different kinds or versions of it: best-five-of-nine-points tiebreaker and best-seven-of-12-points tiebreaker.[23] The first lasts a maximum of 9 points, and awards victory in the set to whichever player or team first reaches 5 points – even if the other player or team already has 4; the margin of victory can be a single point. Because this "9-point" tiebreaker must end after a maximum of 9 points, even if neither player or team has a 2-point (or greater) margin, Van Alen also called it a "sudden-death tiebreaker" (If and when the score reached four points all, both players faced simultaneous set point and/or match point.). This type of tiebreaker had its Grand Slam debut at 1970 US Open and was employed there until 1974. Apart from being used for 5 years at US Open it was also used 1 year at Wimbledon and for a while on the Virginia Slims circuit and in American Colleges.
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The purpose of the Northwest Louisiana CTA is to make an positive impact on the tennis community by providing support and resources in the development of programs, events, leagues, and facilities promoting tennis as a lifetime healthful sport within North Louisiana to all ages and all skill levels. The NWLACTA will collaborate with the USTA and other associations and programs in the pursuit of these goals.
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