Kolkmann stresses the importance of taking no shortcuts during the preparation phases. "For our courts, we require at least a 10-inch stone base over a geotextile fabric. We use 6 to 8 inches of clear stone [screened and washed limestone used as a drainage medium] and then a 2- to 4-inch lift of 3/4-inch minus stone. The entire court is surrounded by 4-inch drain tile to reduce the amount of surface and subsurface water that gets under a court. The lift of clear stone also allows the water to drain under the court much faster, should any get underneath. All the stone is laser-graded to the correct slope."

I see also that the coaches in US, try to change the natural shots that the children have, by trying to help them to develop the perfect technique. I have seen children with wonderful one hand backhand, that is then changed to a two hand backhand by their coaches. That does not make sense. Coaches should help the children to improve their natural shots and techniques, instead of changing everything. That, in my oppinion, is one of the biggest mistakes the coaches here in US, are doing with the children.
The ProCushion System, depicted in the illustration above, is the ultimate professional and residential cushioned option for tennis court surfaces. This 100% acrylic coating system is designed to provide optimum resilience and spin responsive play. The shock absorbing layers of the ProCushion system provide unparalleled player comfort at an affordable cost. Flexible acrylic binders maximize the feel of the rubber granules for decades after application.

In most professional play and some amateur competition, there is an officiating head judge or chair umpire (usually referred to as the umpire), who sits in a raised chair to one side of the court. The umpire has absolute authority to make factual determinations. The umpire may be assisted by line judges, who determine whether the ball has landed within the required part of the court and who also call foot faults. There also may be a net judge who determines whether the ball has touched the net during service. The umpire has the right to overrule a line judge or a net judge if the umpire is sure that a clear mistake has been made.[59]

Even your choice of shoes, socks, and other clothing are important considerations when you learn to play tennis. As opposed to running shoes, tennis shoes are made to withstand side-to-side movement. They should have a herringbone tread for longer lasting protection and grip. Socks should be thick and able to absorb sweat, thereby preventing infections such as athlete’s foot. Generally, tennis clothing is white, a color chosen to best reflect the sun and keep the player cooler. (Wear the appropriate gear even when just beginning to learn to play tennis!)
4. Most adults do not develop motor skills any more in separate training sessions. Even worse, some engage in fitness and similar health and wellness exercises that develop strength through isotonic exercises (lifting weights, pulling cords, etc.) rather than dynamic exercises like throwing medicine balls or situations where footwork, dynamic balance, and dynamic force are developed (soccer, volleyball, etc.).
You acknowledge and agree that USTA, in management of certain sweepstakes, promotions, or programs, may share your information with sweepstakes partners or US Open Sponsors (collectively, “Permitted Third Parties”). Your registration constitutes permission for the USTA and Permitted Third Parties to contact you for promotional and/or marketing purposes. Your relationship with each Permitted Third Party is independent of the USTA and subject to that Permitted Third Party’s terms of use and/or privacy policy. By registering, you acknowledge and agree that USTA does not and cannot control the actions of any Permitted Third Party, and you further agree to release and hold harmless USTA from any and all liability, injury, loss or damage of any kind that may arise from or out of your interaction with such Permitted Third Party.
The Babolat Pure Drive Junior racket has a child-friendly yet professional design so that even the youngest can feel great. Thanks to the high-quality workmanship and the use of only first-class materials, a junior player will certainly have a lot of fun with this children’s tennis racket. The price-performance ratio of the Pure Drive Junior racquet is excellent.

Earlier this summer, I got to half-watch him play just a couple of courts away from where I was playing. The club had arranged a set of doubles pitting Kirill and another young tennis instructor against two players from the Pelham High School tennis team who had recently won the state championship in doubles. The two of them, terrific teenage players, had been playing together for years; Kirill had had a hand in their development. So what I was mostly interested in, honestly, as dozens of club members gathered on the veranda of the tennis house to watch, was how Kirill would deal with this, what the etiquette was. Would he be nervous or restrained?
The right tennis racquet for you is based largely upon your current skill level. Beginners tend to do well with large racquets because they have bigger sweet spots. Advanced players tend to want high-tech racquets made of composite materials for excellent power in a lighter weight. Your swing is another factor in the type of racquet you need. If you’re a powerful swinger, look for a smaller control racquet to help you have more control. If your swing is more about finesse, consider a larger power racquet to help you add a little oomph to your game.

In the early 1980s, "graphite" (carbon fibre) composites were introduced, and other materials were added to the composite, including ceramics, glass fibre, boron, and titanium. Some of the earliest models typically had 20% or more fiberglass, to make them more flexible. Stiff rackets were typically not preferred by most players because of their familiarity with the comfortable softness of wood. These early models tended to be very flexible and not very powerful, although they were a power upgrade over wood and metal rackets. Wilson created the Jack Kramer Pro Staff, the graphite version of the wood racket of the same name extremely popular in the late 70's and early 80's. This was the origin of the extremely influential Wilson Pro Staff 85. Chris Evert's first graphite racket was this Jack Kramer version, which had 20% fiberglass. It was not a market success and she, along with everyone else, quickly replaced it with the stiffer Pro Staff 85, which had 20% kevlar. It used the same mold and had the same braided graphite, but offered a very noticeable improvement in power. The very popular Prince original graphite, an oversize in its most popular form, was also quite influential and used by many pros, especially as juniors. Jennifer Capriati and Monica Seles, for instance, used the Prince graphite to contest their influential Wimbledon match in 1991 that has often been hailed as the beginning of the power baselining game in the WTA, although that claim is somewhat hyperbolic and is, in large part, due to the mistaken impression that the players were hitting much harder when, in fact, the rackets were more powerful. However, the very large head size, when compared with the midsize and, especially, the old "standard" size, made it easier to produce power. The racket also had an open string pattern. The Prince "original" graphite name is rather a misnomer, as it went through some significant design adjustments over its lifetime. For instance, the truly original model had a reverse teardrop head shape, something no subsequent versions had. Stiffer composite rackets, when compared with the first and second generations of graphite composites, are the contemporary standard. The last wooden racket appearing at Wimbledon appeared in 1987, long after they were abandoned by practically all professionals.[17] Borg tried to stage a comeback with his standard wood racket, after his premature retirement, but it quickly ended in failure, as the standard wood was no match when placed against a stiff midplus graphite. It is also commonly argued that Chris Evert would have been able to beat Martina Navratilova during the latter's most dominant period if she had switched from her wood racket years sooner. Additionally, the last influential wooden racket, the Prince Woodie, had layers of graphite to increase its stiffness and was an oversize. It was used by Tommy Haas, Gabriela Sabatini, and quite a few others. It offered very little power but did offer much more surface area than a standard-size wooden frame. Sabatini found it helpful, as compared with smaller rackets, due to her production of heavy topspin. The only woman to beat Martina Navratilova in 1984, Kathleen Horvath, used the Prince Woodie, one of only six losses Navratilova suffered in a three-year stretch involving 260 matches.[18]
By the 1960s, Budge and others had added Pancho Gonzales and Lew Hoad to the list of contenders. Budge reportedly believed that Gonzales was the greatest player ever.[99] Gonzales said about Hoad, "When Lew's game was at its peak nobody could touch him. ... I think his game was the best game ever. Better than mine. He was capable of making more shots than anybody. His two volleys were great. His overhead was enormous. He had the most natural tennis mind with the most natural tennis physique."[100]
A denser pattern is often considered to deliver more control, at the expense of spin potential. A more open pattern is often believed to offer greater potential for power and spin. However, how much power is produced by a player can be strongly influenced by how a player adapts to the characteristics of the racket. Some players may hit harder with a dense string pattern, producing faster shots because of the added control from the dense pattern. Rackets, including those of much of the wood era, are marked with a recommended string tension range. The basic rule is that a lower tension creates more power (from the trampoline effect) and a higher string tension creates more control (less string deformation which results in a more predictable the power and angle of the departure from the string bed.) Some professionals used small-headed rackets with flexible-material strings (natural gut) strung at very high tension. Examples include Pete Sampras and Björn Borg. Some used large-headed rackets with very inflexible-material strings (kevlar). Andrei Agassi is an example. Many professionals during the standard wood era strung at relatively low tension and used natural gut string; both decisions were to increase the trampoline effect for more power. By contrast, almost every professional player today uses the much stiffer polyester string in their much stiffer rackets which also have larger heads and which tend to be lighter. Madeline Hauptman sold a line of rackets, called the MAD RAQ, which featured a Star of David pattern (a six-pointed figure consisting of two interlaced equilateral triangles), as it used three strings instead of two for stringing the racket. This pattern is used in snowshoes. This stringing pattern was said to feature less string notching, improving string lifespan. It was even claimed that many pro shops refused to carry the racket because less string breakage would reduce string and stringing service sales. It has also been claimed that the racket is more difficult to string than a two string racket. However, the Wilson T-2000-type requires a great deal more time for stringing than a typical racket and rackets of that series were very popular. Whatever the cause of the failure of the MAD RAQ in the marketplace, it was the only time a snowshoe pattern was used in tennis. Hauptman switched her racket line to a two string diamond pattern (PowerAngle). This pattern had already been used in much earlier rackets but had not had much popularity. It is said to be easier to string than the MAD RAQ but does not have the benefit of reduced string notching, at least not to the same degree. The claim is that this diagonal pattern offers more comfort than a traditional square pattern.
A few heavy hitters like their tennis racquets to be a little top heavy so they generate more power when hitting a ball but that is usually the exception as opposed to the rule. In general, it is usually best to start out with a tennis racquet that is balanced; this is especially true if you are a novice player. A balanced racquet will give you a little more control as you swing at and strike a tennis ball.Things that can throw a tennis racquet’s balance off are such things as an oversized racquet head, extra padding on a handle and innovative racquet designs that purposely redistribute weight to a specific area. So be aware of this when you are shopping for your new tennis racquet.

Focus on ball trajectory and how cleanly you hit the ball – this will then allow your brain to merge the technical instruction you’ve been working on with the natural way of movement that creates effortless power – and eventually sound tennis techniques will emerge that simultaneously produce a lot of effortless power and allow easy adjustments to different situations in the game.


I was born in Colombia but lived all my life in Venezuela. I got a tennis scholarship at Oklahoma, where I got my bachelor degree in Psychology. I worked as head pro at Club Nautico De Maracaibo in Venezuela for 23 years where I made lots of friends and made a lots of great players! 8 players I have taught played tennis for colleges here in the USA. I am a real friendly person and very serious about tennis. Sincerely yours, Jose

4. Most adults do not develop motor skills any more in separate training sessions. Even worse, some engage in fitness and similar health and wellness exercises that develop strength through isotonic exercises (lifting weights, pulling cords, etc.) rather than dynamic exercises like throwing medicine balls or situations where footwork, dynamic balance, and dynamic force are developed (soccer, volleyball, etc.).

In 1926, promoter C. C. Pyle established the first professional tennis tour with a group of American and French tennis players playing exhibition matches to paying audiences.[26][37] The most notable of these early professionals were the American Vinnie Richards and the Frenchwoman Suzanne Lenglen.[26][38] Once a player turned pro he or she was no longer permitted to compete in the major (amateur) tournaments.[26]
×