Takes All Comers: Since most of the best tennis rackets run in the $200 range, we wanted to give the entry-level buyer something that would give them quality and control without ruining their budget. Prince rackets generally cater to a slightly less affluent clientele, but they still make incredible, versatile stuff for the price. Their original Red is a great place to start. No matter what kind of play style you have, the large sweet spot sunk into the friendly 105 square-inch head is a bargain at twice the price. The 9.9oz weight works well for anyone with tennis elbow or the casual player who needs to adjust to moving a racket around. Whether you are a baseliner needing speed and power or a net player that wants size, the Red is a very solid, if not particularly flashy or sexy choice. [Purchase: $80]
Advanced players improve their performance through a number of accoutrements. Vibration dampeners may be interlaced in the proximal part of the string array for improved feel. Racket handles may be customized with absorbent or rubber-like materials to improve the players' grip. Players often use sweat bands on their wrists to keep their hands dry and head bands or bandanas to keep the sweat out of their eyes as well. Finally, although the game can be played in a variety of shoes, specialized tennis shoes have wide, flat soles for stability and a built-up front structure to avoid excess wear.
Well, as you learn to play tennis, you need to know how to continue the play. If the serve is successful, the play may continue with a variety of shots. Often, play will continue with groundstrokes. Groundstrokes are shots taken after the ball has bounced once. These can be hit with a forehand or a backhand stroke. The forehand stroke is made with the face of the racket, the palm of your hand facing the ball. The backhand stroke is made with the reverse side of the racket, with the palm of your hand facing away from the ball. To successfully learn to play tennis, you’ll need to learn to hit forehand shots; and to successfully learn to play tennis, you’ll need to learn to hit backhand shots.
In 2019, the Australian Open introduced a "super-tiebreak" for singles in the final set, replacing the previous format in which the final set would continue until one player was ahead by two games. The new format for the final set is similar to the "12-point tiebreaker", but with the winner being the first to 10 points instead of 7 (and they must still win by 2 points).[27] Tennis Australia has called this a "10-point tiebreak", though this is inconsistent with the reasoning behind the naming of the "12-point tiebreaker", which represents the minimum total number of points (a score of 7–5); the same reasoning would make the new format an "18-point tiebreaker" with a minimum winning score of 10–8.[28]
Well, as you learn to play tennis, you need to know how to continue the play. If the serve is successful, the play may continue with a variety of shots. Often, play will continue with groundstrokes. Groundstrokes are shots taken after the ball has bounced once. These can be hit with a forehand or a backhand stroke. The forehand stroke is made with the face of the racket, the palm of your hand facing the ball. The backhand stroke is made with the reverse side of the racket, with the palm of your hand facing away from the ball. To successfully learn to play tennis, you’ll need to learn to hit forehand shots; and to successfully learn to play tennis, you’ll need to learn to hit backhand shots.
The new, extremely thin high-tech carbon fibre is a very interesting material for tennis rackets: as used in Prince’s TXT Warrior rackets, for example, in the shaft and heart area, it brings the typical advantages of a rigid frame (stability, control, power). Unlike a conventional stiff racquet, the Textreme racquets are comfortable and playable without the slightest compromises!
Post-tensioned concrete is reinforced with a grid of high-strength sheathed steel tendons, or cables. While the concrete is curing, the cables are tensioned in both directions and held permanently under stress by anchoring them in a perimeter beam. This squeezing action keeps the concrete in compression, improving its tensile (or bending) strength. The more the concrete is squeezed together, the less likely it is that shrinkage cracks will develop or open. (See a more complete description of post-tensioning from the Post-Tensioning Institute.)
A break point occurs if the receiver, not the server, has a chance to win the game with the next point. Break points are of particular importance because serving is generally considered advantageous, with servers being expected to win games in which they are serving. A receiver who has one (score of 30–40 or advantage), two (score of 15–40) or three (score of love-40) consecutive chances to win the game has break point, double break point or triple break point, respectively. If the receiver does, in fact, win their break point, the game is awarded to the receiver, and the receiver is said to have converted their break point. If the receiver fails to win their break point it is called a failure to convert. Winning break points, and thus the game, is also referred to as breaking serve, as the receiver has disrupted, or broken the natural advantage of the server. If in the following game the previous server also wins a break point it is referred to as breaking back. Except where tie-breaks apply, at least one break of serve is required to win a set.
Some areas of this Site may require you to submit information in order for you to benefit from the specified features (such as newsletter subscriptions, tips/pointers, order processing and so forth) or to participate in a particular activity (such as sweepstakes or other promotions and so forth). You will be informed at each information collection point what information is required and what information is optional.
It is all based on how comfortable you are with the racket. If the racket works well with you, it is a good one. Are you hitting too many frames? Too many nets? Too many outs? Too many faults? No? then your racket is fine. Can you hit a good strong shot without the need for any strenuous effort on your part? Can you smash with the racket without your arm getting sore? Can you hit a nice serve with the right spin? If yes, you have a good racket.

The first thing to consider when looking at tennis racquets is the frame. You have many options when it comes to size, shape, material, and so on. A racquet with a larger head will help you make more powerful swings, whereas a smaller head affords you more control. Can’t decide? A mid-sized head offers a little of both! For length, a longer racquet can offer better leverage per swing for more power, but a traditional-length racquet provides a better balance of power and control. When considering the weight of a racquet, remember that heavier tennis racquets offer more power and less control while lighter racquets yield more control at the expense of power. The shape of your racquet determines where the sweet spot is: Traditional oval racquets have a sweet spot at the bottom, and a teardrop racquet features a larger sweet spot overall.
HTML5 is the language some Web sites are coded in and may be used to store information on your computer or device about your Service usage activities. This information may be retrieved by us to help us manage our Services, such as by giving us information about how our Services are being used by our visitors, how they can be improved, and to customize them for our users. Various browsers may offer their own management tools for removing HTML5.

Now that you know the basics about the game, it is time you start practicing with your tennis buddy. There is nothing like whacking a ball after a hard day at work to relieve stress. However, as a tennis coach, I do not encourage you to whack the ball because you will end up picking balls rather than rallying with your buddy. I strongly encourage that you start slow. You can start from the service line and then gradually progress to the baseline. So plan regular meetings with your tennis buddy.


Louisiana State University in Shreveport is a public tennis establishment located at 81 University Pl, Shreveport, LA 71115. There are 8 public tennis courts at this tennis facility. The tennis courts are not lighted. You can call this tennis location at 318-797-5061. Get listed now at this tennis facility to participate with other tennis friends. Check out the Automatic Player Matching Service - Tennis Round will connect you with other tennis players automatically based on your skill level and match history. Earn points for playing and move up in the rankings.

The track at Astoria Park is currently closed for reconstruction as part of our Anchor Parks initiative to improve the quality of major parks across the city. While the track is under construction, we encourage you to join the New York Road Runners’ free weekly NYRR Open Run, which meets for walks and runs on Saturdays at 9:00 a.m. north of the parking lot, by the pool. You can also look for NYRR Mile Markers to track your distance along a measured course in the park. Please visit our Capital Projects Tracker for the latest on our construction progress.
“Gerry,” he began, “you yourself have said you want to get better, and you are getting better.” There followed a series of rhetorical questions involving whether the Utah coach was getting better, anyone else my age was getting better — whether he himself was getting better. He swept his arm up toward the main courts and noted that some of the players in the midst of matches up there, men in their 40s or early 50s, had been on high school teams and college teams. Wasn’t I holding my own in playing doubles with them?
"Carpet" in tennis means any removable court covering.[7] Indoor arenas store rolls of rubber-backed court surfacing and install it temporarily for tennis events, but they are not in use any more for professional events. A short piled form of artificial turf infilled with sand is used for some outdoor courts, particularly in Asia. Carpet is generally a fast surface, faster than hardcourt, with low bounce.[7]
You should be aware that when you are on the Site you could be directed to other sites beyond our control. For example, if you "click" on a banner advertisement, the "click" may take you off the Site onto a different Web site. This includes links from advertisers, sponsors and partners that may use the Site’s logo as part of a co-branding agreement. These other Web sites may send their own cookies to you, independently collect data or solicit personal information and may or may not have their own published privacy policies. If you visit a Website that is linked to our Site, you should consult that site’s privacy policy before providing any personal information. Please note that the USTA Family of Companies are not responsible for the privacy practices of third parties.

Some browsers have incorporated a Do Not Track (DNT) feature. These features, when turned on, send a signal that you prefer that the website you are visiting not collect and use data regarding your online searching and browsing activities. As there is not yet a common understanding on how to interpret the DNT signal, we currently do not respond to DNT signals on our site.
These Terms of Use are effective until terminated by either party. Your access to any and all USTA Family of Companies sites may be terminated immediately without notice from us if, in our sole discretion, you fail to comply with any term of these Terms of Use. Upon such termination, you must cease use of the USTA Family of Companies site and destroy all materials obtained from such site and all copies thereof, whether made under the terms of these Terms of Use or otherwise. You may terminate at any time by discontinuing use of all USTA Family of Companies sites. Upon such termination, you must destroy all materials obtained from any and all such sites and all related documentation and all copies and installations thereof, whether made under the terms of this Terms of Use or otherwise.

You are entirely responsible for maintaining the confidentiality and security of your Account Information and for all activities that occur under your account. You agree to indemnify, defend and hold the USTA Family of Companies, the USTA’ Family of Companies’ subsidiaries and other affiliated companies/organizations and sponsors and their respective officers, directors, employees and agents harmless from and against any third-party claims, demands, actions, suits, proceedings, liabilities, damages, losses, judgments and expenses (including, but not limited to, the costs of collection, reasonable attorney’s fees and other reasonable costs of defense or enforcing your obligations hereunder) resulting from or arising out of any breach of any of your representations or misuse of this or any other USTA Family of Companies site or of any site linking to this or any other USTA Family of Companies site. You shall use your best efforts to cooperate with us in the defense of any claim.
In Tennis: A Cultural History, Heiner Gillmeister reveals that on December 8, 1874, British army officer Walter Clopton Wingfield wrote to Harry Gem, commenting that he (Wingfield) had been experimenting with his version of lawn tennis “for a year and a half”.[13] In December 1873, Wingfield designed and patented a game which he called sphairistikè (Greek: σφαιριστική, meaning "ball-playing"), and was soon known simply as "sticky" – for the amusement of guests at a garden party on his friend's estate of Nantclwyd Hall, in Llanelidan, Wales.[14] According to R. D. C. Evans, turfgrass agronomist, "Sports historians all agree that [Wingfield] deserves much of the credit for the development of modern tennis."[8][15] According to Honor Godfrey, museum curator at Wimbledon, Wingfield "popularized this game enormously. He produced a boxed set which included a net, poles, rackets, balls for playing the game – and most importantly you had his rules. He was absolutely terrific at marketing and he sent his game all over the world. He had very good connections with the clergy, the law profession, and the aristocracy and he sent thousands of sets out in the first year or so, in 1874."[16] The world's oldest annual tennis tournament took place at Leamington Lawn Tennis Club in Birmingham in 1874.[17] This was three years before the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club would hold its first championships at Wimbledon, in 1877. The first Championships culminated a significant debate on how to standardize the rules.[16]
×