Although this suggestion might sound attractive, the medieval period ran until around the end of the 15th century (i.e. until about 1500), and at that time clocks recorded only the hours (1 to 12). It was not until about 1690, when the pendulum system was invented, that clocks regularly had minute hands. So the concept of tennis scores originating from the clock face could not have come from medieval times.[6]

Moving, always moving, and all the time thinking and checking off: Maintain the continental grip, the base knuckle of the index finger of my left hand resting on the bevel one notch counterclockwise from the racket handle’s high noon. (Check.) Keep the racket in front and the racket head up. (Check.) Knees slightly bent. (Check.) Turn sideways quickly, and punch with your shoulder, don’t swing; and tighten your grip at the moment the ball is about to hit the strings.

The line dividing the service line in two is called the center line or center service line. The boxes this center line creates are called the service boxes; depending on a player's position, he or she will have to hit the ball into one of these when serving.[53] A ball is out only if none of it has hit the line or the area inside the lines upon its first bounce. All lines are required to be between 1 and 2 inches (25 and 51 mm) in width, with the exception of the baseline which can be up to 4 inches (100 mm) wide (although in practice it is often created the same width as the rest).[52]


Points are counted using ordinary numbering. The set is won by the player who has scored at least seven points in the tiebreak and at least two points more than their opponent. For example, if the score is 6 points to 5 and the player with 6 points wins the next point, they win the tiebreak (7 points to 5), as well as the set (7 games to 6). If the player with 5 points wins the point instead (for a score of 6–6), the tiebreak continues and cannot be won on the next point (7–6 or 6–7), since no player will be two points ahead. In the scoring of the set, sometimes the tiebreak points are shown as well as the game count, e.g., 710–68. Another way of listing the score of the tiebreak is to list only the loser's points. For example, if the set score is listed as 7–6(8), the tiebreak score was 10–8 (since the 8 is the loser's score, and the winner must win by two points). Similarly, 7–6(3) means the tiebreak score was 7–3.
Wheelchair tennis can be played by able-bodied players as well as people who require a wheelchair for mobility. An extra bounce is permitted. This rule makes it possible to have mixed wheelchair and able-bodied matches. It is possible for a doubles team to consist of a wheelchair player and an able-bodied player (referred to as "one-up, one-down"), or for a wheelchair player to play against an able-bodied player. In such cases, the extra bounce is permitted for the wheelchair users only.
For our TW testers, this new version is not as comfortable as the DR: it is much firmer, especially on the upper part. On the positive side, the majority of the team was able to play effectively thanks to the EZONE 98 (305 g). Although it poses a bit of a control problem, this racquet offers more power and spin than the previous version, making it more dangerous on powerful hits.

Popular lawn tennis rackets vary primarily in length, weight, balance point, stiffness, beam thickness, string pattern, string density, and head size. They generally conform to unofficial standards that differ from past rackets. Currently, almost all adult rackets produced by companies such as Prince Sports, Yonex, Wilson, Babolat , Dunlop Sport, Head, Tecnifibre, and Völkl are made from a graphite composite. Those made from wood (the original racket frame row material), steel, fiberglass, aluminium are considered obsolete, although those materials are technically legal for play. Inexpensive rackets often have poor performance characteristics such as excessive flexibility and inadequate weight. No recent manufacturers use single-throated beams, although Prince tried to reintroduce the single throat design in the 1990s: the only professional who used one was Mirjana Lučić. Braided graphite rackets were considered high-end until recently and molded rackets have been the norm for some time. Molding is less expensive to manufacture and offer high stiffness. Dunlop started the transition away from aluminum based frames and popularised graphite-based racquets. Especially the Dunlop Max 200G model, once used to great effect by Steffi Graf and John McEnroe set the tone. Graphite-composite rackets are today's industry standard in professional tennis.


Again, begin with the grip. Whether you choose to use a one handed backhand or a two handed backhand, it’s important to grip the racket closer to the top bevel with your dominant hand. For a two handed backhand, the non-dominant hand should grip the racket underneath the handle, and keeping your palm rested firmly on the racket handle. Fingers should be free of tension, and not too close together. The grip for the two hander should have your other hand adjacent to the first. It’s necessary to practice both the forehand and backhand tennis strokes as you learn to play tennis.
In 1954, Van Alen founded the International Tennis Hall of Fame, a non-profit museum in Newport, Rhode Island.[41] The building contains a large collection of tennis memorabilia as well as a hall of fame honouring prominent members and tennis players from all over the world. Each year, a grass court tournament and an induction ceremony honoring new Hall of Fame members are hosted on its grounds.
As rackets have become lighter, stiffer, and larger-headed, the professional game has moved, basically completely, from softer and more flexible string materials to stiff materials. This is, in large part, to tone down the additional power potential of the "modern" rackets. However, it also is related to the tendency for different string materials to move out of place when subjected to heavy topspin strokes. Polyester is the string of choice today because of that resistance, despite its increased stiffness (harsher feel and more aggravating for the joints) and reduced tension-holding ability (versus a string like natural gut, which excels at that). The top professionals of the 1970s and earlier, despite having access to stiffer materials such as nylon, nearly always chose to use the very flexible natural gut instead. String bed stiffness can be increased by using stiffer materials, such as kevlar and polyester, by increasing the density of the string pattern, and by stringing with a higher tension. Racket makers and players have experimented with very dense string patterns and very "open" patterns, beginning with the Snauwaert Hi Ten, which had a pattern with as few as 12 mains and 13 crosses. Doubles great Mark Woodforde used one of them.[14] More recently, Grigor Dimitrov is known for having played with a very open-patterned racket during part of his career. String choice, both in thickness and material, string tension, string pattern, and string pattern density can have a very large effect on how a racket performs.
A frequent topic of discussion among tennis fans and commentators is who was the greatest male singles player of all time. By a large margin, an Associated Press poll in 1950 named Bill Tilden as the greatest player of the first half of the 20th century.[95] From 1920 to 1930, Tilden won singles titles at Wimbledon three times and the U.S. Championships seven times. In 1938, however, Donald Budge became the first person to win all four major singles titles during the same calendar year, the Grand Slam, and won six consecutive major titles in 1937 and 1938. Tilden called Budge "the finest player 365 days a year that ever lived."[96] In his 1979 autobiography, Jack Kramer said that, based on consistent play, Budge was the greatest player ever.[97] Some observers, however, also felt that Kramer deserved consideration for the title. Kramer was among the few who dominated amateur and professional tennis during the late 1940s and early 1950s. Tony Trabert has said that of the players he saw before the start of the open era, Kramer was the best male champion.[98]
Head size plays a very key role in a racket's performance characteristics. A larger head size very generally means more power and a larger "sweet spot". This is an area in the string bed that is partially more forgiving on off-center hits and which produces more ball-reflective power from string deformation, known as the trampoline effect. However, large head sizes can increase twisting, which makes off-center hits more difficult to control and can reduce a player's overall power production due to the playing compensating for the extra inherent power, typically with stiffer strings to reduce the increased string deformation of large heads. A smaller head size generally offers more control for many shots, particularly the service and groundstrokes aimed near the lines, but can lead to more shanks (wild misses, from hitting the frame or missing the sweet spot). This drawback is most common for professional players using single-handed topspin backhands, as well as for recreational and aged players at net. Shanking due to small racket head size is typically exacerbated by racket weight, which slows the reaction time, as well as, to a lesser degree, the racket's balance point. In professional tennis, currently-used racket head sizes vary between 95–115 square inches (610–740 cm2), with most players adopting one from 98–108 square inches (630–700 cm2). Rackets with smaller and larger head sizes, 85 and 120–137 square inches (550 and 770–880 cm2), are still produced but are not used by professionals currently. A very small number of professionals, such as Monica Seles, used 125 square inches (810 cm2) rackets during some point in their careers. Rackets with smaller heads than 85 square inches (550 cm2) have not been in production since the 1980s and rackets with larger head sizes than 137 square inches (880 cm2) are not currently legal for the sport, even though only elderly players typically choose to use rackets beyond 115 square inches (740 cm2) and it is nearly unheard-of for a serious player who is not elderly to choose a racket over 125 square inches (810 cm2). The WEED company, founded by Tad Weed, specializes in producing very large rackets, primarily for the elderly market. Rackets that are moderately higher in power production, moderately lower in weight, moderately larger in size, and which typically possess a slightly head-heavy balance are often called "tweener rackets."[11] Rackets that have the smallest heads in current use, the highest weights in current use, and headlight or even balance are referred to as "players' rackets". Oversize rackets, typically 110 square inches (710 cm2) in size, were once pejoratively referred to as "granny sticks" but resistance to them being seen as illegitimate rackets for younger players decreased dramatically with the successful use of these rackets by a small number professionals such as Andre Agassi and Pam Shriver. Originally, even midsize frames (85 square inches (550 cm2)) were considered jumbo, and some top players, such as Martina Navratilova and Rod Laver said they should be banned for making the sport too easy. Later, these same professionals, including John McEnroe, signed a letter supporting a switch back to wood frames, or a limitation to the original standard size of approximately 65 square inches (420 cm2). Perhaps the last professional to use a standard-size racket in professional tennis was Aaron Krickstein, known for the strongly-contested match against Connors at the 1991 US Open. He used a Wilson Ultra-II standard-size graphite racket also used in the 1980s by the hard-hitting teen Andrea Jaeger. The first oversize, the fiberglass Bentley Fortissimo from Germany, was praised by racket designers but was considered too large to be taken seriously by the small number of players who were exposed to it.
In a legal service, the ball travels over the net (without touching it) and into the diagonally opposite service box. If the ball hits the net but lands in the service box, this is a let or net service, which is void, and the server retakes that serve. The player can serve any number of let services in a point and they are always treated as voids and not as faults. A fault is a serve that falls long or wide of the service box, or does not clear the net. There is also a "foot fault", which occurs when a player's foot touches the baseline or an extension of the center mark before the ball is hit. If the second service is also a fault, the server double faults, and the receiver wins the point. However, if the serve is in, it is considered a legal service.
A few heavy hitters like their tennis racquets to be a little top heavy so they generate more power when hitting a ball but that is usually the exception as opposed to the rule. In general, it is usually best to start out with a tennis racquet that is balanced; this is especially true if you are a novice player. A balanced racquet will give you a little more control as you swing at and strike a tennis ball.Things that can throw a tennis racquet’s balance off are such things as an oversized racquet head, extra padding on a handle and innovative racquet designs that purposely redistribute weight to a specific area. So be aware of this when you are shopping for your new tennis racquet.
There is nothing that says you cannot look good when you play the game of tennis and that includes having a stylish tennis racquet that accentuates your attire. It is probably not something that you want to be a major factor in your purchasing decision but if you have narrowed your choices down to 2 or 3 similar racquets it can be used as the deciding factor.

The official music video for "Tennis Court" was directed by Joel Kefali, who previously worked with Lorde on the accompanying video for her debut single "Royals".[70] The video was filmed as a one-shot.[71] Lorde appears in "black clothing, braided hair, and dark lipstick."[71] It features Lorde staring into the camera as the song plays; she does not lip sync the lyrics except for the word "Yeah!" after each verse and during the chorus.[71][72] The set lighting fades in and out throughout the video.[73]


Tennis is a wonderful sport. It is a great exercise for both the mind and the body and sometimes critics say that it is all a mind sport. Unlike many other sports, all the responsibility to perform well is on you. If you are not in the right mindset you probably will not get very far. While I do agree with this statement, a great athletic body definitely helps more often than not. Players like Rafael Nadal have used their extremely well-built bodies to become legends, they work on their bodies as much as they work on their minds. 

"Tennis Court" is a song recorded by New Zealand singer Lorde. She co-wrote the song with Joel Little, with production handled by the latter. Universal Music Group (UMG) released the song as the second single from her debut studio album Pure Heroine (2013) in Australia and New Zealand on 7 June 2013. On the same day, the label released an extended play (EP) of the same name containing three additional tracks throughout Europe. "Tennis Court" combines alternative pop, art pop and downtempo music with hip hop elements and incorporates minimalist production with simple synthesiser instrumentation and an electronic pulse. Inspired by Lorde's fresh insights into the music industry, the lyrics address Lorde's newfound fame and nostalgia for her hometown.
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It is imagined that clock faces were used on court, with a quarter move of the hand to indicate a score of 15, 30, and 45. When the hand moved to 60, the game was over. However, in order to ensure that the game could not be won by a one-point difference in players' scores, the idea of "deuce" was introduced. To make the score stay within the "60" ticks on the clock face, the 45 was changed to 40. Therefore, if both players had 40, the first player to score would receive ten, and that would move the clock to 50. If the player scored a second time before the opponent is able to score, they would be awarded another ten and the clock would move to 60. The 60 signifies the end of the game. However, if a player fails to score twice in a row, then the clock would move back to 40 to establish another "deuce".[4][5]
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Developed in collaboration with the master Roger Federer, this black snowshoe with its sleek design offers new tactile sensations thanks to 9 layers of paints alternating gloss and matt finish for an unprecedented result. The shiny, soft black in the center of the frame highlights the Pro Staff’s ability to quickly penetrate the air to attack each ball. The rougher black base, on the other hand, emphasizes the ability to enter more difficult phases of play.
"Forum" means a chat area, message board, social media site, app, email function or other function which allows you to transmit or submit material to a USTA Family of Companies site for display, storage or distribution, offered as part of any USTA Family of Companies site or by an affiliated company/organization and/or service provider of the USTA Family of Companies. Where the Forum is provided on a site other than a USTA Family of Companies site, you will be bound by the terms of service and privacy policy of the site you have linked to. If you participate in any Forum within a USTA Family of Companies site, you must not and agree that you will not through the use of any Submission or otherwise:
One of the many types of affordable racquets available to you is a junior tennis racquet. These are designed primarily for younger players, and they come in relatively small sizes in order to accommodate these players. It's never too early to start learning and practicing tennis, and with junior racquets, people of all ages can get in on the fun. Not only are these items short in length, but they are also comprised of lightweight materials that allow for smooth, maneuverable motions when swinging. These racquets typically range in size from 19 inches to 26 inches. Even though these tennis items are meant to be used by younger players, a junior tennis racquet can be used by anyone who prefers the feel of a smaller racquet.
Aside from the historical significance of these events, they also carry larger prize funds than any other tour event and are worth double the number of ranking points to the champion than in the next echelon of tournaments, the Masters 1000 (men) and Premier events (women).[83][84] Another distinguishing feature is the number of players in the singles draw. There are 128, more than any other professional tennis tournament. This draw is composed of 32 seeded players, other players ranked in the world's top 100, qualifiers, and players who receive invitations through wild cards. Grand Slam men's tournaments have best-of-five set matches while the women play best-of-three. Grand Slam tournaments are among the small number of events that last two weeks, the others being the Indian Wells Masters and the Miami Masters.

Are you planning to learn tennis? Tennis is such an exciting game that not only strengthens your body, but sharpens your mind and reflexes as well. So it is no surprise to me if you are planning to learn tennis. Learning the game is not difficult for a number of reasons that will be explained in the article later, but be warned that to become a master in this game requires a lot of practice, hard work and dedication. Andre Agassi, famous tennis player has said, “Nothing can substitute for just plain hard work.” In short, if you don’t have the passion or dedication to learn tennis then you will never be able to master the game like a pro!
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OK. Now that you understand the court, let’s learn to play tennis with some specifics. As already mentioned, a tennis beginner can play a singles or doubles game with either one or two players on each side of the net. The game — and, each point — begins with a serve taken from behind the baseline. The ball must bounce into the diagonally opposite service court. (Your serve may be your most difficult stroke as you learn to play tennis.) The play — or point — continues until one player fails to hit the ball back or hits it out-of-bounds.
A set consists of a sequence of games played with service alternating between games, ending when the count of games won meets certain criteria. Typically, a player wins a set by winning at least six games and at least two games more than the opponent. If one player has won six games and the opponent five, an additional game is played. If the leading player wins that game, the player wins the set 7–5. If the trailing player wins the game (tying the set 6–6) a tie-break is played. A tie-break, played under a separate set of rules, allows one player to win one more game and thus the set, to give a final set score of 7–6. A "love" set means that the loser of the set won zero games, colloquially termed a 'jam donut' in the USA.[55] In tournament play, the chair umpire announces the winner of the set and the overall score. The final score in sets is always read with the winning player's score first, e.g. "6–2, 4–6, 6–0, 7–5".
A popular alternative to advantage scoring is "no-advantage" (or "no-ad") scoring, created by James Van Alen in order to shorten match playing time.[12] No-advantage scoring is a scoring method in which the first player to reach four points wins the game. No-ad scoring eliminates the requirement that a player must win by two points. Therefore, if the game is tied at deuce, the next player to win a point wins the game. This method of scoring is used in most World TeamTennis matches.[13][14] When this style of play is implemented, at deuce, the receiver then chooses from which side of the court he or she desires to return the serve. However, in no-ad mixed doubles play gender always serves to the same gender at game point and during the final point of tiebreaks.[15]

Help: Scoreboard offers live tennis scores for all major ATP, WTA, Challanger and ITF tournaments together with tennis grandslams. Get ATP, WTA tennis tournament brackets, set results and match details. Follow the entire tennis season live on Scoreboard – from Hopman Cup live scores, Australian Open and Wimbledon to US Open scores, ATP Masters and WTA Championships. Scoreboard.com tennis section offers real-time WTA and ATP scores live, latest ATP results, Fed Cup and Davis Cup live tennis scores.


The score of a complete match may be given simply by sets won, or with the scores in each set given separately. In either case, the match winner's score is stated first. In the former, shorter form, a match might be listed as 3–1 (i.e. three sets to one). In the latter form, this same match might be further described as "7–5, 6–7(4–7), 6–4, 7–6(8–6)". (As noted above, an alternate form of writing the tiebreak score lists only the loser's score—e.g., "7–6(6)" for the fourth set in the example.) This match was won three sets to one, with the match loser winning the second set on a tiebreaker. The numbers in parentheses, normally included in printed scorelines but omitted when spoken, indicate the duration of the tiebreaker following a given set. Here, the match winner lost the second-set tiebreaker 7–4 and won the fourth-set tiebreaker 8–6.

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Wilson Jack Kramer Autograph Midsize Wood Racquet 4 1/2. Vintage graphite/wood mix frame. The frame and head are absolutely straight. It was strung briefly before. There is a very slight scuff on the head (see photo) which may have come from years of storage/handling or someone swinging the racquet, but that’s it. The grip and the rest of the racquet show the like-new condition of this collectable racquet.
Tennis is an Olympic sport and is played at all levels of society and at all ages. The sport can be played by anyone who can hold a racket, including wheelchair users. The modern game of tennis originated in Birmingham, England, in the late 19th century as lawn tennis.[1] It had close connections both to various field (lawn) games such as croquet and bowls as well as to the older racket sport today called real tennis. During most of the 19th century, in fact, the term tennis referred to real tennis, not lawn tennis.
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