Regardless of the number of games and sets in a match, players must continuously rotate sides when the total number of games in a set is an odd number. For instance, if the total game score in a set is 3-2, simply add 3 + 2 = 5. Since 5 is an odd number, the players rotate sides prior to starting the next game. If the total game score in a set is 5-1, simply add 5 + 1 = 6. Since 6 is an even number, the players do not rotate sides.
A frequent topic of discussion among tennis fans and commentators is who was the greatest male singles player of all time. By a large margin, an Associated Press poll in 1950 named Bill Tilden as the greatest player of the first half of the 20th century.[95] From 1920 to 1930, Tilden won singles titles at Wimbledon three times and the U.S. Championships seven times. In 1938, however, Donald Budge became the first person to win all four major singles titles during the same calendar year, the Grand Slam, and won six consecutive major titles in 1937 and 1938. Tilden called Budge "the finest player 365 days a year that ever lived."[96] In his 1979 autobiography, Jack Kramer said that, based on consistent play, Budge was the greatest player ever.[97] Some observers, however, also felt that Kramer deserved consideration for the title. Kramer was among the few who dominated amateur and professional tennis during the late 1940s and early 1950s. Tony Trabert has said that of the players he saw before the start of the open era, Kramer was the best male champion.[98]
The tennis scoring system is a way to keep track of tennis matches (including pick-up games). Some tennis matches are played as part of a tournament. (Tournaments may have various categories, such as singles and doubles.) The great majority are organised as a single-elimination tournament, with competitors being eliminated after a single loss, and the overall winner being the last competitor without a loss. Optimally, such tournaments have a number of competitors equal to a power of two in order to fully fill out a single elimination bracket. In many professional and top-level amateur events, the brackets are seeded according to a recognised ranking system, in order to keep the best players in the field from facing each other until as late in the tournament as possible; additionally, if byes are necessary because of a less-than-full bracket, those byes in the first round are usually given to the highest-seeded competitors.

Here is a great racquet from a very reputable tennis equipment manufacturer. Wilson is a well-known name when it comes to quality tennis products, to say the least, and this good racquet does not disappoint. It features such things as grippy string technology that quickly dampens the energy of the ball as it strikes the racket so you can get better spin on your return shots. It is also ultra-lightweight and has a new class paint finish that gives it some style.

^ Jump up to: a b "Grays of Cambridge: History" Archived 2011-07-06 at the Wayback Machine - makers of rackets and founded in 1855 by Henry John Gray, the Champion Racquets Player of England. "In those days, the rackets were made from one piece English ash, with a suede leather grip and natural gut. ... The 1980s witnessed a period of re-structuring and consolidation. The Cambridge racquets factory was forced to close in face of the move to graphite rackets, and production was moved to the Far east."

Badminton rackets are light, with top quality rackets weighing between about 70 and 95  grams (with guts ). Modern rackets are composed of carbon fiber composite (graphite reinforced plastic), which may be augmented by a variety of materials. Carbon fiber has an excellent strength to weight ratio, is stiff, and gives excellent kinetic energy transfer. Before the adoption of carbon fiber composite, rackets were made of wood to their excessive weight and cost.


In 2019, the Australian Open introduced a "super-tiebreak" for singles in the final set, replacing the previous format in which the final set would continue until one player was ahead by two games. The new format for the final set is similar to the "12-point tiebreaker", but with the winner being the first to 10 points instead of 7 (and they must still win by 2 points).[27] Tennis Australia has called this a "10-point tiebreak", though this is inconsistent with the reasoning behind the naming of the "12-point tiebreaker", which represents the minimum total number of points (a score of 7–5); the same reasoning would make the new format an "18-point tiebreaker" with a minimum winning score of 10–8.[28]


Most people I come across with want to achieve that level and you can too with just little bit of hard work. Setup a weekly routine in which you play tennis at least 3-4 times a week, give one day to doing some cardio or some light weight lifting to strengthen your core. Having a strong core is vital to your shots. If you have a dedicated hitting partner then its but if not then try joining a club that is not too heavy on the wallet. You will find like minded people who have the same objective as you and are looking for hitting partners. This has the added benefit of increasing your social circle.
If you learn to play tennis, it can be your first step toward a lifetime of fitness and pleasure. And now that we’ve discussed how to learn to play tennis with the basics, you’re ready to get out on the court. There’s no better way to learn to play tennis than with practice; with practice, you’ll not only learn to play tennis, you’ll learn to play tennis well.
In standard play, scoring beyond a "deuce" score, in which both players have scored three points each, requires that one player must get two points ahead in order to win the game. This type of tennis scoring is known as "advantage scoring" (or "ads"). The side which wins the next point after deuce is said to have the advantage. If they lose the next point, the score is again deuce, since the score is tied. If the side with the advantage wins the next point, that side has won the game, since they have a lead of two points. When the server is the player with the advantage, the score may be called as "advantage in". When the server's opponent has the advantage, the score may be called as "advantage out". These phrases are sometimes shortened to "ad in" or "van in" (or "my ad") and "ad out" (or "your ad"). Alternatively, the players' names are used: in professional tournaments the umpire announces the score in this format (e.g. "advantage Nadal" or "advantage Williams").
The player who would normally be serving after 6–6 is the one to serve first in the tiebreak, and the tiebreak is considered a service game for this player. The server begins his or her service from the deuce court and serves one point. After the first point, the serve changes to the first server's opponent. Each player then serves two consecutive points for the remainder of the tiebreak. The first of each two-point sequence starts from the server's advantage court and the second starts from the deuce court. In this way, the sum of the scores is even when the server serves from the deuce court. After every six points, the players switch ends of the court; note that the side-changes during the tiebreak will occur in the middle of a server's two-point sequence. At the end of the tiebreak, the players switch ends of the court again, since the set score is always odd (13 games).
^ Lorde (2013). Lyrical Influences (VEVO LIFT): Brought to You By McDonald's (video). VEVO/YouTube. Event occurs at 1:49. Retrieved 22 November 2013. I think my writing process with "Tennis Court" was quite different to how I normally write. Generally, I will have a lyric forming before I go into the studio. But with this one, we wrote the music and beat before we wrote anything lyrically
To determine who serves first, you flip a coin or (more likely) spin a racket. Whoever wins the toss gets to decide one of four things: that she wants to serve first, that she wants to receive first, which side of the court she wants to start on (in which case, the opponent chooses who serves first), or that she wants to leave the choices up to her opponent.
The most common causes for that are actually the coaches themselves because they only correct technique rather than involve players in various drills that would take their attention off their body and make them focus on tasks like reading the incoming ball, improving timing and rhythm, improving the feel for the strokes, hitting targets on the court, working on tactics like making opponents run, looking to wrong foot the opponent, and so on.

Some areas of this Site may require you to submit information in order for you to benefit from the specified features (such as newsletter subscriptions, tips/pointers, order processing and so forth) or to participate in a particular activity (such as sweepstakes or other promotions and so forth). You will be informed at each information collection point what information is required and what information is optional.
Automatic information is information collected by our computers when you request Web pages from the Site. Automatic information may include such information as the page served, the time, the source of the request, the type of browser making the request, the preceding page view and other such information. When analyzed, this data helps us analyze how visitors arrive at the Site, what type of content is most popular, what type of visitors in the aggregate are interested in particular kinds of content and advertising, and the like.
Hit the ball with an “up and over” action as if you were throwing the racket at it — and, after hitting the ball, follow through with your swing. This follow through will propel you forward into the court, prepared to hit the returned shot. Good! You’re progressing well in your efforts to learn to play tennis! If you’re unhappy with your serve — perhaps even miss the ball when you swing — don’t worry; this is common when you first learn to play tennis.
The stiffest graphite racket that has been sold is the Prince More Game MP, which is rated at 80 RA on the industry-standard Babolat measuring equipment. The Prince More series used two pieces (a top side and bottom side of the racket, or a left side and a right side) and no grommet strip. Prince had briefly used a design without a grommet strip in an early version of its "original" graphite oversize. The most famous user of a More series racket was Martina Navratilova, who returned to play doubles in her 40s, using a Prince More Control DB (a midplus) for her initial wins in the mixed doubles at Wimbledon and the Australian Open with Leander Paes. She had used the stiffer More Game MP prior. Navratilova later switched to a design by Warren Bosworth (the founder of Bosworth Tennis) which had a customized asymmetric grip and an unusual geometric head shape. Stiffer rackets typically offer more power and control at the expense of increased ball shock, which can lead to injury or tennis elbow aggravation. Typically, power and control are at odds. However, in the case of stiff rackets, less energy is dissipated by the racket deforming, transmitting it back to the ball. Control is improved because there is less deformation. However, a player's overall power level may decrease due to the need to moderate ball striking effort to reduce discomfort and even injury. Although known as a hard hitter in her younger years, in her 40s she was known more as a precision player who used finesse (and especially tactics) more than power. In fact, the last doubles partner she won a major with in mixed, Bob Bryan, remarked on how slow her serve was, despite how effective she was on the court. Navratilova also used string that was much softer than what anyone else on tour used (thick uncoated natural gut), to help compensate for the stiffness of her racket. The vastly higher injury rate in tennis (when compared with the wood era) is, in part, due to the increase in stiffness, both of the racket and of the strings.
Please exercise discretion while browsing the Internet using any USTA Family of Companies site. You should be aware that while you are on a USTA Family of Companies site, you could be directed to other sites that are beyond our control. There are links to other sites from USTA Family of Companies pages that take you outside of our service. This includes links from regional sections, sponsors and content partners that may use our logo(s) as part of a co-branding or other agreement. These other sites may send their own cookies to users, collect data, solicit personal information, or contain information that you may find inappropriate or offensive. The USTA Family of Companies reserve the right to disable links from third party sites to any USTA Family of Companies site. We make no representations concerning the content of sites linked to any USTA Family of Companies site or listed in any of our directories. Consequently, we cannot be held responsible for the accuracy, relevancy, copyright compliance, legality or decency of material contained in sites listed in our search results or otherwise linked to a USTA Family of Companies site. If you have any concerns regarding any external link, you should contact the link’s administrator or Website.
I reckon the best thing would be for courses like Tennis Xpress to introduce a ‘recreational’ level for those who want to play on Sundays and may have hit some balls with mates before but who need help correcting technique or gaining more confidence in their game – leaving the very, very rusty or beginners to go slowly without fear of ridicule or frustration.
We specialize in adult tennis lessons for young professionals in their 20's and 30s living in Miami.  We have the complete pathway for adults who want to learn tennis and meet new friends including: Novice, Intermediate and Advanced level programs. See Our Class Schedule Here: http://www.backhand-city.com/group_lessons/lesson_series Our classes also feature a social component to our lesson series and included in your purchase as we head out for drinks after class.   Players who join our classes also get on our email newsletter which offers things to do and place to play in and around the Miami tennis community. Get ready to imm ... View Profile
To begin to learn to play tennis, you need to understand its unusual scoring method. As a tennis beginner, you must understand how to keep score. Scoring doesn’t start with 1 or 0 — it starts with the term “love”, equivalent to zero. The first point is then 15 followed by the next point, 30, and the next point, 40. The following point is the winning point and it’s called game point or set point or match point — depending on which you are playing.
Although Kolkmann admits that concrete courts cost substantially more initially than asphalt, an asphalt surface often requires more frequent and costly upkeep over its lifespan to repair cracking and settling. "Through our own recordkeeping, we estimate that an asphalt court will be unavailable for play, due to repairs being made, for about 100 days over a 20-year period," he says. "During this same time, a post-tensioned slab would be down for about 20 days. In our climate in the upper Midwest, repairs can only be done in the summer, when everyone wants to play. For a private court, the downtime may not be as crucial. But for a club, it can be a substantial unknown cost in lost revenue."
Size. The overall size of a regulation tennis court for doubles play is 60 x 120 feet (per the International Tennis Federation). However, you must allow additional space around the court perimeter to give the contractor room to work and to permit the installation of drainage, landscaping, and fencing. Munson recommends leaving at least 12 feet between the court sidelines and the closest fixed obstructions, and 21 feet between the baselines and fixed obstructions. Where space is limited, you can downsize to a slightly smaller court. ITF recommends a minimum court size of 56 x 114 feet. An NBA/NCAA regulation full-size basketball court is 94 feet long and 50 feet wide. For backyards without enough acreage for a pro court, half courts can suffice for one-on-one games. (See this diagram of court dimensions from Half Court Sports.)

The referee, who is usually located off the court, is the final authority about tennis rules. When called to the court by a player or team captain, the referee may overrule the umpire's decision if the tennis rules were violated (question of law) but may not change the umpire's decision on a question of fact. If, however, the referee is on the court during play, the referee may overrule the umpire's decision (This would only happen in Davis Cup or Fed Cup matches, not at the World Group level, when a chair umpire from a non-neutral country is in the chair).[59]


"Carpet" in tennis means any removable court covering.[7] Indoor arenas store rolls of rubber-backed court surfacing and install it temporarily for tennis events, but they are not in use any more for professional events. A short piled form of artificial turf infilled with sand is used for some outdoor courts, particularly in Asia. Carpet is generally a fast surface, faster than hardcourt, with low bounce.[7]
It was a thought — being a tennis player — that first came to me five years ago when I was months from my 55th birthday. It wasn’t that I imagined I was going to become an athlete. I am a tennis fan, and I turn on ESPN and attend the United States Open each year with the understanding that the men and women I love to watch are, as they were not when I was a boy, a breed apart: selection for size and intense training and competition from early childhood is increasingly creating a sort of warrior class in sports. I wanted to become a very good recreational player. Someday.

A game point occurs in tennis whenever the player who is in the lead in the game needs only one more point to win the game. The terminology is extended to sets (set point), matches (match point), and even championships (championship point). For example, if the player who is serving has a score of 40-love, the player has a triple game point (triple set point, etc.) as the player has three consecutive chances to win the game. Game points, set points, and match points are not part of official scoring and are not announced by the chair umpire in tournament play.
The new, extremely thin high-tech carbon fibre is a very interesting material for tennis rackets: as used in Prince’s TXT Warrior rackets, for example, in the shaft and heart area, it brings the typical advantages of a rigid frame (stability, control, power). Unlike a conventional stiff racquet, the Textreme racquets are comfortable and playable without the slightest compromises!
Welcome to www.usta.com. This site (the “Site”) is owned by United States Tennis Association Incorporated (the "USTA") and is operated by and on behalf of the USTA and its affiliated companies, including USTA National Tennis Center Incorporated, USTA Foundation Incorporated, USTA Player Development Incorporated and US Open Series LLC (collectively, the “USTA Family of Companies,” “we” “us” or “our”). This Privacy Policy is designed to tell you about our practices regarding collection, use and disclosure of information that we may collect from and about you. Please be sure to read this entire Privacy Policy before using or submitting information to this Site.
Although this suggestion might sound attractive, the medieval period ran until around the end of the 15th century (i.e. until about 1500), and at that time clocks recorded only the hours (1 to 12). It was not until about 1690, when the pendulum system was invented, that clocks regularly had minute hands. So the concept of tennis scores originating from the clock face could not have come from medieval times.[6]

Are you planning to learn tennis? Tennis is such an exciting game that not only strengthens your body, but sharpens your mind and reflexes as well. So it is no surprise to me if you are planning to learn tennis. Learning the game is not difficult for a number of reasons that will be explained in the article later, but be warned that to become a master in this game requires a lot of practice, hard work and dedication. Andre Agassi, famous tennis player has said, “Nothing can substitute for just plain hard work.” In short, if you don’t have the passion or dedication to learn tennis then you will never be able to master the game like a pro!
Learning tennis to the extreme levels requires mental fortitude and athletic ability that only a few in this world can manage. But this should not deter you from learning this beautiful no matter what age group you belong to. You can become a pretty awesome tennis player that is satisfied with their game without spending countless hours on court or turning it into a full-time profession. It is just a matter of consistency, the right technique, and some willpower.
First of all I want to let you know how much I enjoy your web page. Great job. Secondly I want to talk about your thoughts on the “perfect technique.” In your Roger Federer video you show how he uses a lot of different stances, not stepping through and things like that and is able to still make great shots. Then you also mention that the way he swings the racquet at contact in all of these examples is why he plays so good. In my opinion it IS because he has practiced the “perfect technique” so much that when he is put into those difficult situations he is able to bring the racquet through the ball the correct way all the time. Because regardless of what your body does your arm still has to produce the shot. All the other stuff like tack back, follow through and stepping through are just helpers to be more consistent. The way I teach my students is to “never change your stroke through the ball no matter how out of position you get.” Can you do this 100% of the time? No, but when you make THAT effort you will be amazed at how well it improves their footwork effort.
The stiffest graphite racket that has been sold is the Prince More Game MP, which is rated at 80 RA on the industry-standard Babolat measuring equipment. The Prince More series used two pieces (a top side and bottom side of the racket, or a left side and a right side) and no grommet strip. Prince had briefly used a design without a grommet strip in an early version of its "original" graphite oversize. The most famous user of a More series racket was Martina Navratilova, who returned to play doubles in her 40s, using a Prince More Control DB (a midplus) for her initial wins in the mixed doubles at Wimbledon and the Australian Open with Leander Paes. She had used the stiffer More Game MP prior. Navratilova later switched to a design by Warren Bosworth (the founder of Bosworth Tennis) which had a customized asymmetric grip and an unusual geometric head shape. Stiffer rackets typically offer more power and control at the expense of increased ball shock, which can lead to injury or tennis elbow aggravation. Typically, power and control are at odds. However, in the case of stiff rackets, less energy is dissipated by the racket deforming, transmitting it back to the ball. Control is improved because there is less deformation. However, a player's overall power level may decrease due to the need to moderate ball striking effort to reduce discomfort and even injury. Although known as a hard hitter in her younger years, in her 40s she was known more as a precision player who used finesse (and especially tactics) more than power. In fact, the last doubles partner she won a major with in mixed, Bob Bryan, remarked on how slow her serve was, despite how effective she was on the court. Navratilova also used string that was much softer than what anyone else on tour used (thick uncoated natural gut), to help compensate for the stiffness of her racket. The vastly higher injury rate in tennis (when compared with the wood era) is, in part, due to the increase in stiffness, both of the racket and of the strings.
Kirill Azovtsev, when I first met him four years ago, was 21, just a few years older than my oldest son. He was an assistant professional at the New York Athletic Club’s tennis facility in Pelham, N.Y., where I live. He had begun playing competitive tennis at 14 in St. Petersburg, Russia, where he was born, and arrived here a few years later with a tennis scholarship to attend Concordia College in Bronxville, where he was part of a team that reached the top 10 in Division II. Even before he graduated, in 2008, he had received the training to become a tennis instructor.

Ball boys and girls may be employed to retrieve balls, pass them to the players, and hand players their towels. They have no adjudicative role. In rare events (e.g., if they are hurt or if they have caused a hindrance), the umpire may ask them for a statement of what actually happened. The umpire may consider their statements when making a decision. In some leagues, especially junior leagues, players make their own calls, trusting each other to be honest. This is the case for many school and university level matches. The referee or referee's assistant, however, can be called on court at a player's request, and the referee or assistant may change a player's call. In unofficiated matches, a ball is out only if the player entitled to make the call is sure that the ball is out.
Before and during the open era, Rod Laver remains the only male player in history to have won the calendar year Grand Slam twice in 1962 and 1969 [101] and also the calendar year Professional Grand Slam in 1967.[102] More recently Björn Borg and Pete Sampras were regarded by many of their contemporaries as among the greatest ever. Andre Agassi, the first of two male players in history to have achieved a Career Golden Slam in singles tennis (followed by Rafael Nadal), has been called the best service returner in the history of the game.[103][104][105][106] He is the first man to win grand slams on all modern surfaces (previous holders of all grand slam tournaments played in an era of grass and clay only), and is regarded by a number of critics and fellow players to be among the greatest players of all time.[103][107][108] However it must be noted that both Rod Laver and Ken Rosewall also won major Pro Slam tournaments on all three surfaces (grass, clay, wood) Rosewall in 1963 and Laver in 1967.[109]

"Carpet" in tennis means any removable court covering.[7] Indoor arenas store rolls of rubber-backed court surfacing and install it temporarily for tennis events, but they are not in use any more for professional events. A short piled form of artificial turf infilled with sand is used for some outdoor courts, particularly in Asia. Carpet is generally a fast surface, faster than hardcourt, with low bounce.[7]
An advantage set is played until a player or team has won at least 6 games and that player or team has a 2-game lead over their opponent(s). The set continues, without tiebreak(er), until a player or team wins the set by 2 games. Advantage sets are no longer played under the rules of the United States Tennis Association,[17] nor in the Australian Open starting from 2019;[18] however, they are still used in the final sets in men's and women's singles in the French Open, Wimbledon, and Fed Cup. Mixed doubles at the Grand Slams (except for Wimbledon) are a best-of-three format with the final set being played as a "Super Tie Break" (sometimes referred to as a "best of two" format) except at Wimbledon, which still plays a best-of-three match with the final set played as an advantage set and the first two played as tie-break sets.
The weight of the tennis racquet you use is very important too. You need a heavier tennis racquet to generate more ball speed but you also need to be able to swing it fast enough to hit that ball in the first place. So you have to balance the weight of the tennis racquet you use with other considerations too.For instance, if you are slight in stature it may be to your benefit to use a little lighter racquet to help you turn on the ball faster as you go to return a shot. If you are a player whose game strategy is to win on long volleys you may benefit from using a lighter racquet so you do not get tired out as much swinging so much during a match.
David Foster Wallace, an amateur tennis player himself at Urbana High School in Illinois,[130] included tennis in many of his works of nonfiction and fiction including "Tennis Player Michael Joyce's Professional Artistry as a Paradigm of Certain Stuff about Choice, Freedom, Discipline, Joy, Grotesquerie, and Human Completeness," the autobiographical piece "Derivative Sport in Tornado Alley," and Infinite Jest, which is partially set at the fictional "Enfield Tennis Academy" in Massachusetts.
A few heavy hitters like their tennis racquets to be a little top heavy so they generate more power when hitting a ball but that is usually the exception as opposed to the rule. In general, it is usually best to start out with a tennis racquet that is balanced; this is especially true if you are a novice player. A balanced racquet will give you a little more control as you swing at and strike a tennis ball.Things that can throw a tennis racquet’s balance off are such things as an oversized racquet head, extra padding on a handle and innovative racquet designs that purposely redistribute weight to a specific area. So be aware of this when you are shopping for your new tennis racquet.
Tennis balls were originally made of cloth strips stitched together with thread and stuffed with feathers.[44] Modern tennis balls are made of hollow vulcanized rubber with a felt coating. Traditionally white, the predominant colour was gradually changed to optic yellow in the latter part of the 20th century to allow for improved visibility. Tennis balls must conform to certain criteria for size, weight, deformation, and bounce to be approved for regulation play. The International Tennis Federation (ITF) defines the official diameter as 65.41–68.58 mm (2.575–2.700 in). Balls must weigh between 56.0 and 59.4 g (1.98 and 2.10 oz).[45] Tennis balls were traditionally manufactured in the United States and Europe. Although the process of producing the balls has remained virtually unchanged for the past 100 years, the majority of manufacturing now takes place in the Far East. The relocation is due to cheaper labour costs and materials in the region.[46] Tournaments that are played under the ITF Rules of Tennis must use balls that are approved by the International Tennis Federation (ITF) and be named on the official ITF list of approved tennis balls.[47]
×