The song's lyrics address Lorde's newfound fame.[32][33] In an interview with Spotify in May 2013, Lorde explained that "Tennis Court" was inspired by her friends and daily life in her hometown Auckland, saying that the song was a summary of the events she witnessed during the previous months of her life.[34] On her Tumblr account, she elaborated on the tennis court imagery as "a symbol of nostalgia" that embodied memories of her hometown. Lorde also elucidated that the track reflected the changes in her life at the moment, when she had ventured into a career in music.[35] She also took inspiration from "how superficial people can be" after having perceived the mechanism of the music industry.[36] Paul Lester from The Guardian opined that the song criticises the extravagant lifestyle of the rich and shares the same sentiment with "Royals" and "Million Dollar Bills" from The Love Club EP.[37] During the songwriting process, Lorde explained that she took an interest to the works of American photographer Gregory Crewdson due to his depictions of human life, suburbia and sense of loneliness.[38]
Each side of the court is lined with two white marks to indicate the width of the court for singles play and the larger width for doubles play. The short white line extending from the net to halfway down the court is the service court. As a tennis beginner, you can’t learn to play tennis without understanding these rules of the court. With ample practice time working on tennis strokes, the right tennis techniques may be in fact a element that can propel a tennis player allowing them to hit shots they never could with their old and inefficient tennis strokes. That means that all of the tennis strokes can be improved, the tennis forehand, backhand and serve are the three biggest tennis strokes in the modern game. All three tennis strokes are also incumbent upon having good tennis technique to make these tennis strokes work.

The server’s score is always announced first. So, for instance if the server has two points and his opponent, the receiver, has none, the score is 30-love. If a game is tied at 40-40, it is called “deuce”. If the server gets the next point, it’s called server advantage; if the receiver gets the next point, it’s called receiver advantage. It’s advantage because the player who has it only needs one more point to win. Should they not make this one point the game goes back to deuce. Scoring is perhaps a bit complicated, but necessary to understand as you learn to play tennis.
Help: Scoreboard offers live tennis scores for all major ATP, WTA, Challanger and ITF tournaments together with tennis grandslams. Get ATP, WTA tennis tournament brackets, set results and match details. Follow the entire tennis season live on Scoreboard – from Hopman Cup live scores, Australian Open and Wimbledon to US Open scores, ATP Masters and WTA Championships. Scoreboard.com tennis section offers real-time WTA and ATP scores live, latest ATP results, Fed Cup and Davis Cup live tennis scores.
The string pattern of a tennis racquet plays a large part in how the ball is hit and what it does after impact. Racquets are typically strung in a grid with patterns of 16 by 18, 16 by 19, and 18 by 20. The first two options allow for a more open string pattern whereas the second pattern has strings that are more closely packed together, creating a variety of differences in how the ball reacts when hit. The type of racquet that you should choose largely depends on your tennis goals:
The tiebreak is sometimes not employed for the final set of a match and an advantage set is used instead. Therefore, the deciding set must be played until one player or team has won two more games than the opponent. Of the major tennis championships, this now only applies in the French Open. In the US Open, a tiebreak is played in the deciding set (fifth set for the men, third set for the women) at 6–6. Starting in 2019, in Wimbledon, a tiebreak will be played if the score reaches 12–12 in the final set. In the Australian Open, a "first to 10" tiebreak is played in the deciding set if it reaches 6–6.[20][21] (When the tiebreak was first introduced at Wimbledon in 1971, it was invoked at 8–8 rather than 6–6.) The US Open formerly held "Super Saturday" where the two men's semi-finals were played along with the women's final on the second Saturday of the event; therefore a tie-break was more prudent where player rest and scheduling is more important.
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Never let it be said that tennis is not a manly game. Sure, there isn’t a lot of bone crunching going on, but there is Maria Sharapova and Daniela Hantuchova grunting and groaning the day away, which you can’t beat no matter how nice your stick is. Long maligned as a game for pale hemophiliacs in white shorts, tennis has come back in a big way and if you aren’t ready to play with some knowledge of the game and a good tennis racket you’re going to miss the bus. That’s why we’re here.


For our TW testers, this new version is not as comfortable as the DR: it is much firmer, especially on the upper part. On the positive side, the majority of the team was able to play effectively thanks to the EZONE 98 (305 g). Although it poses a bit of a control problem, this racquet offers more power and spin than the previous version, making it more dangerous on powerful hits.

I’ve spent years in attempts to understand tennis techniques and secrets that few people ever learn in tennis lessons. Most competitive junior tennis players have the privilege of time and money to develop and learn tennis techniques, but maybe you don’t. Tennis techniques are an important part for every tennis player and even small changes in tennis technique can result in big improvements.


As it happens, I was reading a ruefully captivating new memoir called “Swimming Studies,” by a onetime contender for the Canadian Olympic team, Leanne Shapton, which explores how growing up a competitive swimmer formed her habits of heart and mind. Years later, her daily rhythms and life choices, her nightly dreams, her understanding of duration, pleasure, pain and reward, remain informed by her hours in the training pool. Swimming strokes carved the contours of her inner life, and it’s not at all clear she is thankful for that. Of course, Andre Agassi, in his memoir, writes of how the aloneness of singles tennis — the very thing that imparted to Kirill a kind of Emersonian self-reliance, as he understands it — just enlarged his loneliness. You never know.
The other type of tiebreaker Van Alen introduced is the "12-point" tiebreaker that is most familiar and widely used today. Because it ends as soon as either player or team reaches 7 points – provided that that player or team leads the other at that point by at least two points – it can actually be over in as few as 7 points. However, because the winning player or team must win by a margin of at least two points, a "12-point" tiebreaker may go beyond 12 points – sometimes well beyond. That is why Van Alen derisively likened it to a "lingering death", in contrast to the 9-point (or fewer) "sudden-death tiebreaker" that he recommended and preferred.
Picking a good one usually depends on your play style. Heavier rackets are slower, but give you more power. Lighter rackets offer maneuverability, but you won’t be able to hit a grand slam. Smaller racket heads concentrate power while larger ones help newer players get a hold of the ball. If you play at the net, you need something light, fast, and large, while baseliners need heavier rackets that give them power and help them drop spin on the ball. You must find the right mix of power and precision to suit your personality. To help you, here is our 7 best tennis rackets.

There is nothing that says you cannot look good when you play the game of tennis and that includes having a stylish tennis racquet that accentuates your attire. It is probably not something that you want to be a major factor in your purchasing decision but if you have narrowed your choices down to 2 or 3 similar racquets it can be used as the deciding factor.
Hello my name is Paolo Losno, I've been a full time tennis coach for the last 6 years. I work with all age groups as well as level of play. I played tennis during high school for and at the university level, am certified with a Professional level of coaching from the PTR, USTA and the USPTA. Have been working the after school tennis programs at various elementary schools during the past 2 years as well as worked with competitive junior players as of late. ... View Profile
Very simply, find yourself a certified and reputable teaching professional (“pro”) and take a handful or dozen lessons over the course of a few weeks to jump-start the learning process and help you retain and apply the instructors teachings. Don’t be surprised or alarmed if the pro has you doing some things that feel awkward, or asks you to change the way you’ve been doing things before. He or she may have you doing certain exercises or “drills” that are designed to develop specific skills that, to you, may seem impractical or odd, but which actually work. Be patient, be alert, be attentive, Listen and apply as much as you can. Finally, come prepared to each lesson by having practiced at least once or twice since the previous lesson, and bring water and a towel, sunglasses, sunscreen and a cap to prevent sunburn and heat exhaustion.
In 1926, promoter C. C. Pyle established the first professional tennis tour with a group of American and French tennis players playing exhibition matches to paying audiences.[26][37] The most notable of these early professionals were the American Vinnie Richards and the Frenchwoman Suzanne Lenglen.[26][38] Once a player turned pro he or she was no longer permitted to compete in the major (amateur) tournaments.[26]
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