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Choosing the right tennis racquet is the best way to ensure optimal performance, aside from practice and matches. This is why we at Midwest Sports stocks such a mammoth collection. We want you to find the best racquet for your game. Select among technical options including head size, weight, and balance. Do you prefer comfort, control or power? You can also browse by price and brand.
Developed in collaboration with the master Roger Federer, this black snowshoe with its sleek design offers new tactile sensations thanks to 9 layers of paints alternating gloss and matt finish for an unprecedented result. The shiny, soft black in the center of the frame highlights the Pro Staff’s ability to quickly penetrate the air to attack each ball. The rougher black base, on the other hand, emphasizes the ability to enter more difficult phases of play.
Never let it be said that tennis is not a manly game. Sure, there isn’t a lot of bone crunching going on, but there is Maria Sharapova and Daniela Hantuchova grunting and groaning the day away, which you can’t beat no matter how nice your stick is. Long maligned as a game for pale hemophiliacs in white shorts, tennis has come back in a big way and if you aren’t ready to play with some knowledge of the game and a good tennis racket you’re going to miss the bus. That’s why we’re here.
When both sides have won the same number of points then: when each side has won one, or two, points, the score is described as "15-all" and "30-all" (or "15-up" and "30-up"), respectively. However, if each player has won three points, the score is called as "deuce", not "40–all". From that point on in the game, whenever the score is tied, it is described as "deuce", regardless of how many points have been played.
All sessions vary depending on the level of the player, the type of training program and the duration of the session. I divide them into 4 parts (order may vary as well): 1) power and control on the court: I design a plan so that the player focuses on developing his/her power and strength to be in control of his game from the moment he/she steps on the court. 2) drills 3) serves: I focus a lot on serve because it is very important for the player to build confidence on his/her serve. 4) sets: Depending on the level of the player, I like to arrange sets so they are used to pay attention to every point, and work on their conc ... View Profile
The referee, who is usually located off the court, is the final authority about tennis rules. When called to the court by a player or team captain, the referee may overrule the umpire's decision if the tennis rules were violated (question of law) but may not change the umpire's decision on a question of fact. If, however, the referee is on the court during play, the referee may overrule the umpire's decision (This would only happen in Davis Cup or Fed Cup matches, not at the World Group level, when a chair umpire from a non-neutral country is in the chair).[59]
For right-handed players, the backhand is a stroke that begins on the left side of their body, continues across their body as contact is made with the ball, and ends on the right side of their body. It can be executed with either one hand or with both and is generally considered more difficult to master than the forehand. For most of the 20th century, the backhand was performed with one hand, using either an eastern or a continental grip. The first notable players to use two hands were the 1930s Australians Vivian McGrath and John Bromwich, but they were lonely exceptions. The two-handed grip gained popularity in the 1970s as Björn Borg, Chris Evert, Jimmy Connors, and later Mats Wilander and Marat Safin used it to great effect, and it is now used by a large number of the world's best players, including Rafael Nadal and Serena Williams.[77]
Kolkmann stresses the importance of taking no shortcuts during the preparation phases. "For our courts, we require at least a 10-inch stone base over a geotextile fabric. We use 6 to 8 inches of clear stone [screened and washed limestone used as a drainage medium] and then a 2- to 4-inch lift of 3/4-inch minus stone. The entire court is surrounded by 4-inch drain tile to reduce the amount of surface and subsurface water that gets under a court. The lift of clear stone also allows the water to drain under the court much faster, should any get underneath. All the stone is laser-graded to the correct slope."
Of the current four Grand Slam tournaments, the Australian and US Open use hard courts, French Open is played on clay, and Wimbledon, the only Grand Slam to have always been played on the same surface, is played on grass. The Australian Open switched from grass to hard courts in 1988 and in its early years the French championship alternated between clay and sand/rubble courts. The US Open is the only major to have been played on three surfaces; it was played on grass from its inception until 1974, clay from 1975 until 1977 and hard courts since it moved from the West Side Tennis Club to the National Tennis Center in 1978.
Finally, choosing the right equipment is essential as you learn to play tennis. Proper grip size avoids pain. To measure the correct grip size, hold your racket hand out palm side up, and measure from the crease of the ring finger to the tip of the ring finger. This should be the measurement around your racket handle, generally about four inches in diameter.
Although this suggestion might sound attractive, the medieval period ran until around the end of the 15th century (i.e. until about 1500), and at that time clocks recorded only the hours (1 to 12). It was not until about 1690, when the pendulum system was invented, that clocks regularly had minute hands. So the concept of tennis scores originating from the clock face could not have come from medieval times.[6]

On 7 June 2013, Universal Music Group released "Tennis Court" for digital download as Lorde's second single following "Royals" in Australia and New Zealand, where Lorde's cover of The Replacements' 1985 song "Swingin Party" serves as the B-side.[9][10] On the same day, an EP of the same name was released digitally throughout Europe. The EP contains three additional tracks—"Swingin Party", "Biting Down" and "Bravado"—all of which were previously included on The Love Club EP.[11] On 22 July, the EP was released as a 10-inch vinyl in the UK by Virgin EMI Records.[12] "Tennis Court" was later included as the opening track on Lorde's debut studio album Pure Heroine, released on 27 September 2013.[13]


The four Grand Slam tournaments are considered to be the most prestigious tennis events in the world. They are held annually and comprise, in chronological order, the Australian Open, the French Open, Wimbledon, and the US Open. Apart from the Olympic Games, Davis Cup, Fed Cup, and Hopman Cup, they are the only tournaments regulated by the International Tennis Federation (ITF).[82] The ITF's national associations, Tennis Australia (Australian Open), the Fédération Française de Tennis (French Open), the Lawn Tennis Association (Wimbledon) and the United States Tennis Association (US Open) are delegated the responsibility to organize these events.[82]
Try a backhand stroke. The backhand is one of the easiest strokes to master. Grip the racquet with both hands and hold it out to the side. It should look similar to a baseball player at bat. When the ball approaches, hit it hard at a slight upward angle. This stroke hits the ball hard and is a great way to be sure that your ball will get into the service area.[9]

For length, 21 to 26 inches (53 to 66 cm) is normally the junior racket range, while 27 inches (69 cm) is for stronger more physically-mature players. Some are also available at lengths of 27.5 to 29 inches (70 to 74 cm). The Gamma Big Bubba was produced with a 32 inches (81 cm) length but it is no longer legal in that length. Gamma responded by changing the length of the grip portion of the racket, to continue sales. The length restriction was based on the concern that such long rackets would make the serve too dominant, but that concern has never been objectively supported with testing. Moreover, some players, such as John Isner, are much taller and have longer arms than average professionals (and especially low stature ones), giving them a much larger advantage in terms of height for the service than is possible with several inches of racket length. This makes the length restriction more questionable. Finally, the professionals who nearly always choose to use the longest rackets typically choose them because they use two-handed groundstrokes for both forehand and backhand, using the extra length to improve their reach. An example is Marion Bartoli. As this type of player is not dominant in the sport, or even close to being average in terms of per capita representation, the length restriction seems even more unnecessary. Despite Prince's attempt to market longer length "longbody" rackets in the 1990s, standard length remains the overwhelming choice of players, further negating the argument in favor of the length restriction. When most players who choose to use a longer racket than 27 inches (69 cm) choose one, they typically only use a 27.5 inches (70 cm) model, rather than one approaching 30 inches (76 cm). Longer rackets were introduced by Dunlop[10]
It is all based on how comfortable you are with the racket. If the racket works well with you, it is a good one. Are you hitting too many frames? Too many nets? Too many outs? Too many faults? No? then your racket is fine. Can you hit a good strong shot without the need for any strenuous effort on your part? Can you smash with the racket without your arm getting sore? Can you hit a nice serve with the right spin? If yes, you have a good racket.
Thank you very much for this great analysis. I am 46 and started playing Tennis 6 months ago. I am a college lecturer and I have been playing 4 times a week. As you said practising gives me a lot to improve my game. Stressfull matches constricts our strokes definitely. Playing for fun is perfect. Your second point is also true; I can beat young players through my game stragety and tactics although their fitness level is far better than mine. Regards

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Net Worth: The Radical Pro was what was sitting in Andy Murray’s hand when he rocked Wimbeldon, so it damn sure deserves a place in your bag. At 11.5oz it is a nice mid-weight racket, though thanks to the way its balanced it moves like a much lighter piece of equipment. On power swings you are going to notice some sluggishness, but barely enough to make a difference. This is definitely a control players racket with its 98 square-inch head which allows for decent serve speed but sluggers won’t get the crushing power they desire. For smooth operation when making a net play, it works wonders and allows for sniper-level ball placement. For pure power it’s not a winner. [Purchase: $190]
The purpose of the Northwest Louisiana CTA is to make an positive impact on the tennis community by providing support and resources in the development of programs, events, leagues, and facilities promoting tennis as a lifetime healthful sport within North Louisiana to all ages and all skill levels. The NWLACTA will collaborate with the USTA and other associations and programs in the pursuit of these goals.
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