I have 21 years of tennis experience. I've been teaching for 9 years and I'm a USPTA certified professional. As a former scholarship player at FSU I know what it takes to develop students to reach the division 1 college level. My versatility to work with all ages, male or female, and all levels is what I believe to be one of my greatest strengths. I will provide a fun and comfortable tennis environment where the students goals will be identified and lessons will be purposeful towards reaching their goals in tennis. ... View Profile
I accept your thesis — kids & adults learn tennis differently. But there’s a corrolary: As someone who began tennis 10 yerars ago as a retirement activity, I’m confronted by others in my over-70 age group who — I swear — began hitting tennis balls before they could walk. There’s no way I can catch up with them. Should I give up, & just play with others “at my level”? [This is a serious question.] Or should I attempt one-person drills with the aim of improving?

Points are counted using ordinary numbering. The set is won by the player who has scored at least seven points in the tiebreak and at least two points more than their opponent. For example, if the score is 6 points to 5 and the player with 6 points wins the next point, they win the tiebreak (7 points to 5), as well as the set (7 games to 6). If the player with 5 points wins the point instead (for a score of 6–6), the tiebreak continues and cannot be won on the next point (7–6 or 6–7), since no player will be two points ahead. In the scoring of the set, sometimes the tiebreak points are shown as well as the game count, e.g., 710–68. Another way of listing the score of the tiebreak is to list only the loser's points. For example, if the set score is listed as 7–6(8), the tiebreak score was 10–8 (since the 8 is the loser's score, and the winner must win by two points). Similarly, 7–6(3) means the tiebreak score was 7–3.
In standard play, scoring beyond a "deuce" score, in which both players have scored three points each, requires that one player must get two points ahead in order to win the game. This type of tennis scoring is known as "advantage scoring" (or "ads"). The side which wins the next point after deuce is said to have the advantage. If they lose the next point, the score is again deuce, since the score is tied. If the side with the advantage wins the next point, that side has won the game, since they have a lead of two points. When the server is the player with the advantage, the score may be called as "advantage in". When the server's opponent has the advantage, the score may be called as "advantage out". These phrases are sometimes shortened to "ad in" or "van in" (or "my ad") and "ad out" (or "your ad"). Alternatively, the players' names are used: in professional tournaments the umpire announces the score in this format (e.g. "advantage Nadal" or "advantage Williams").
"Tennis Court" was played during the 2013 Wimbledon Championships – Women's Singles Final by British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC).[88] "Tennis Court" was remixed by Australian musician Flume in 2014.[89] In July 2014 American producer Diplo released his version, titled the Diplo's Andre Agassi Reebok Pump Mix.[90] In 2014, "Tennis Court" was featured in the soundtrack of the PlayStation 4, Xbox One and Microsoft Windows versions of Grand Theft Auto V.[91]
In the US, "Tennis Court" was released as a 7-inch vinyl single on 27 August 2013.[14] Lava and Republic Records initially planned to service "Tennis Court" to US modern rock radio on 11 March 2014 and contemporary hit radio (CHR) on 8 April 2014 as the album's third US airplay single, following "Royals" and "Team".[15] Republic cancelled the scheduled release in favour of "Glory and Gore", which impacted modern rock radio on 11 March.[16][17] The label also planned to service "Glory and Gore" to CHR, but subsequently called of its release and serviced "Tennis Court" to CHR as originally planned.[18] "Tennis Court" ultimately impacted hot adult contemporary radio and CHR on 21 and 22 April 2014, respectively.[19][20] It was released to UK radio on 12 May 2014.[21]
The tennis scoring system is a way to keep track of tennis matches (including pick-up games). Some tennis matches are played as part of a tournament. (Tournaments may have various categories, such as singles and doubles.) The great majority are organised as a single-elimination tournament, with competitors being eliminated after a single loss, and the overall winner being the last competitor without a loss. Optimally, such tournaments have a number of competitors equal to a power of two in order to fully fill out a single elimination bracket. In many professional and top-level amateur events, the brackets are seeded according to a recognised ranking system, in order to keep the best players in the field from facing each other until as late in the tournament as possible; additionally, if byes are necessary because of a less-than-full bracket, those byes in the first round are usually given to the highest-seeded competitors.

The rackets from the Wilson Ultra series are processed in the graphite frame construction with carbon fiber, so that a power-loaded playing feeling is created. The oversize head provides good spin characteristics and the power of the club can be controlled very well via the spin. A comfortable racquet handling and a special parallel drilling technology (the strings dampen more vibrations) provide comfort.
In August 2007 the ATP announced major changes to the tour that were introduced in 2009. The Masters Series was renamed to the "Masters 1000", the addition of the number 1000 referring to the number of ranking points earned by the winner of each tournament. Contrary to earlier plans, the number of tournaments was not reduced from nine to eight and the Monte Carlo Masters remains part of the series although, unlike the other events, it does not have a mandatory player commitment. The Hamburg Masters has been downgraded to a 500-point event. The Madrid Masters moved to May and onto clay courts, and a new tournament in Shanghai took over Madrid's former indoor October slot. As of 2011 six of the nine "1000" level tournaments are combined ATP and WTA events.[89]
The string pattern of a tennis racquet plays a large part in how the ball is hit and what it does after impact. Racquets are typically strung in a grid with patterns of 16 by 18, 16 by 19, and 18 by 20. The first two options allow for a more open string pattern whereas the second pattern has strings that are more closely packed together, creating a variety of differences in how the ball reacts when hit. The type of racquet that you should choose largely depends on your tennis goals:
Again, begin with the grip. Whether you choose to use a one handed backhand or a two handed backhand, it’s important to grip the racket closer to the top bevel with your dominant hand. For a two handed backhand, the non-dominant hand should grip the racket underneath the handle, and keeping your palm rested firmly on the racket handle. Fingers should be free of tension, and not too close together. The grip for the two hander should have your other hand adjacent to the first. It’s necessary to practice both the forehand and backhand tennis strokes as you learn to play tennis.
Before heading to a court, make sure that you’ve read our rules and regulations. Follow our permit rules, wear smooth-sole tennis shoes, and use a maximum of six tennis balls on each court. Most courts are open from 8:00 a.m. to dusk, except at Central Park where courts open at 7:00 a.m. and Randall's Island where courts open at 7:00 a.m. and close at 7:00 p.m.
Although Kolkmann admits that concrete courts cost substantially more initially than asphalt, an asphalt surface often requires more frequent and costly upkeep over its lifespan to repair cracking and settling. "Through our own recordkeeping, we estimate that an asphalt court will be unavailable for play, due to repairs being made, for about 100 days over a 20-year period," he says. "During this same time, a post-tensioned slab would be down for about 20 days. In our climate in the upper Midwest, repairs can only be done in the summer, when everyone wants to play. For a private court, the downtime may not be as crucial. But for a club, it can be a substantial unknown cost in lost revenue."

Hello my name is Paolo Losno, I've been a full time tennis coach for the last 6 years. I work with all age groups as well as level of play. I played tennis during high school for and at the university level, am certified with a Professional level of coaching from the PTR, USTA and the USPTA. Have been working the after school tennis programs at various elementary schools during the past 2 years as well as worked with competitive junior players as of late. ... View Profile
The impetus to use some kind of a tie-breaking procedure gained force after a monumental 1969 struggle at Wimbledon between Pancho Gonzales and Charlie Pasarell. This was a 5-set match that lasted five hours and 12 minutes and took 2 days to complete. In the fifth set the 41-year-old Gonzales won all seven match points that Pasarell had against him, twice coming back from 0–40 deficits. The final score was 22–24, 1–6, 16–14, 6–3, 11–9 for Gonzales.

"Tennis Court" is a song recorded by New Zealand singer Lorde. She co-wrote the song with Joel Little, with production handled by the latter. Universal Music Group (UMG) released the song as the second single from her debut studio album Pure Heroine (2013) in Australia and New Zealand on 7 June 2013. On the same day, the label released an extended play (EP) of the same name containing three additional tracks throughout Europe. "Tennis Court" combines alternative pop, art pop and downtempo music with hip hop elements and incorporates minimalist production with simple synthesiser instrumentation and an electronic pulse. Inspired by Lorde's fresh insights into the music industry, the lyrics address Lorde's newfound fame and nostalgia for her hometown.
Kirill Azovtsev, when I first met him four years ago, was 21, just a few years older than my oldest son. He was an assistant professional at the New York Athletic Club’s tennis facility in Pelham, N.Y., where I live. He had begun playing competitive tennis at 14 in St. Petersburg, Russia, where he was born, and arrived here a few years later with a tennis scholarship to attend Concordia College in Bronxville, where he was part of a team that reached the top 10 in Division II. Even before he graduated, in 2008, he had received the training to become a tennis instructor.
This is a pretty serious level of tennis. The NCAA colleges have a very high skill ceiling for their tennis programs. They are looking for players who preferably have an ITF ranking and pretty proficient at their craft. To achieve this level of tennis you have to get your child in training from a very young age, like at 7-9 years old. They should have a dedicated plan for what they are going to do in their formative years because you have to maintain a balance of study and great tennis to get accepted into NCAA colleges on a sports scholarship. If your kid shows the talent then they can learn all the fundamentals in less than two years and they can keep practicing to perfect them.
I have been teaching Tennis for over 30 years.Started playing from I was 11 years old in Jamaica, at 13 was under 14 & 16 Champion, was Junior Caribbean Open Champion. Competed in Orange Bowl in 1972 Competed in Junior Wimbledon in 1973 Won the Edgar Redwin Sportsmanship Award over several years. Youngest Ever All Jamaica Ladies Open Champion at 15. Also won Caribbean Ladies Open Champion in Singles, Doubles & Mixed Doubles. Was Coached by Harry Hopman ,traveled extensively on The WTA Tour competing on the "Avon Circuit," in the " French, Wimbledon & US Open Grand Slam Events." Played U.S. Clay Courts as well as Open events in Hong K ... View Profile
An advantage set is played until a player or team has won at least 6 games and that player or team has a 2-game lead over their opponent(s). The set continues, without tiebreak(er), until a player or team wins the set by 2 games. Advantage sets are no longer played under the rules of the United States Tennis Association,[17] nor in the Australian Open starting from 2019;[18] however, they are still used in the final sets in men's and women's singles in the French Open, Wimbledon, and Fed Cup. Mixed doubles at the Grand Slams (except for Wimbledon) are a best-of-three format with the final set being played as a "Super Tie Break" (sometimes referred to as a "best of two" format) except at Wimbledon, which still plays a best-of-three match with the final set played as an advantage set and the first two played as tie-break sets.
The player who would normally be serving after 6–6 is the one to serve first in the tiebreak, and the tiebreak is considered a service game for this player. The server begins his or her service from the deuce court and serves one point. After the first point, the serve changes to the first server's opponent. Each player then serves two consecutive points for the remainder of the tiebreak. The first of each two-point sequence starts from the server's advantage court and the second starts from the deuce court. In this way, the sum of the scores is even when the server serves from the deuce court. After every six points, the players switch ends of the court; note that the side-changes during the tiebreak will occur in the middle of a server's two-point sequence. At the end of the tiebreak, the players switch ends of the court again, since the set score is always odd (13 games).
Tennis is a great social sport and you can really learn a lot from playing with a partner. Find someone you can play weekly rounds with. Practice with one person gently tossing 25 to 40 balls over the net while the other returns them, then switch. You can also practice hitting the ball back and forth like you would in a game, or try playing a game.

Before and during the open era, Rod Laver remains the only male player in history to have won the calendar year Grand Slam twice in 1962 and 1969 [101] and also the calendar year Professional Grand Slam in 1967.[102] More recently Björn Borg and Pete Sampras were regarded by many of their contemporaries as among the greatest ever. Andre Agassi, the first of two male players in history to have achieved a Career Golden Slam in singles tennis (followed by Rafael Nadal), has been called the best service returner in the history of the game.[103][104][105][106] He is the first man to win grand slams on all modern surfaces (previous holders of all grand slam tournaments played in an era of grass and clay only), and is regarded by a number of critics and fellow players to be among the greatest players of all time.[103][107][108] However it must be noted that both Rod Laver and Ken Rosewall also won major Pro Slam tournaments on all three surfaces (grass, clay, wood) Rosewall in 1963 and Laver in 1967.[109]
In the US, "Tennis Court" was released as a 7-inch vinyl single on 27 August 2013.[14] Lava and Republic Records initially planned to service "Tennis Court" to US modern rock radio on 11 March 2014 and contemporary hit radio (CHR) on 8 April 2014 as the album's third US airplay single, following "Royals" and "Team".[15] Republic cancelled the scheduled release in favour of "Glory and Gore", which impacted modern rock radio on 11 March.[16][17] The label also planned to service "Glory and Gore" to CHR, but subsequently called of its release and serviced "Tennis Court" to CHR as originally planned.[18] "Tennis Court" ultimately impacted hot adult contemporary radio and CHR on 21 and 22 April 2014, respectively.[19][20] It was released to UK radio on 12 May 2014.[21]

Most people I come across with want to achieve that level and you can too with just little bit of hard work. Setup a weekly routine in which you play tennis at least 3-4 times a week, give one day to doing some cardio or some light weight lifting to strengthen your core. Having a strong core is vital to your shots. If you have a dedicated hitting partner then its but if not then try joining a club that is not too heavy on the wallet. You will find like minded people who have the same objective as you and are looking for hitting partners. This has the added benefit of increasing your social circle.
Learn the basics of tennis scoring. One player serves the ball per game. From the time the ball is served, one point is available to either player. The point is awarded when the ball goes out of bounds, hits the net, or is missed by a player. The game ends after one player has scored four points with a margin of at least two points over the loser. For example, a score of 4 - 2 means that the game is over, but a score of 4 - 3 means that the game must continue.[5]
Tennis magazine selected Martina Navratilova as the greatest female tennis player for the years 1965 through 2005.[126][127] Tennis historian and journalist Bud Collins has called Navratilova "arguably, the greatest player of all time."[128] Billie Jean King said about Navratilova in 2006, "She's the greatest singles, doubles and mixed doubles player who's ever lived."[129]

One of the many types of affordable racquets available to you is a junior tennis racquet. These are designed primarily for younger players, and they come in relatively small sizes in order to accommodate these players. It's never too early to start learning and practicing tennis, and with junior racquets, people of all ages can get in on the fun. Not only are these items short in length, but they are also comprised of lightweight materials that allow for smooth, maneuverable motions when swinging. These racquets typically range in size from 19 inches to 26 inches. Even though these tennis items are meant to be used by younger players, a junior tennis racquet can be used by anyone who prefers the feel of a smaller racquet.
These Terms of Use are effective until terminated by either party. Your access to any and all USTA Family of Companies sites may be terminated immediately without notice from us if, in our sole discretion, you fail to comply with any term of these Terms of Use. Upon such termination, you must cease use of the USTA Family of Companies site and destroy all materials obtained from such site and all copies thereof, whether made under the terms of these Terms of Use or otherwise. You may terminate at any time by discontinuing use of all USTA Family of Companies sites. Upon such termination, you must destroy all materials obtained from any and all such sites and all related documentation and all copies and installations thereof, whether made under the terms of this Terms of Use or otherwise.
Wilson Jack Kramer Autograph Midsize Wood Racquet 4 1/2. Vintage graphite/wood mix frame. The frame and head are absolutely straight. It was strung briefly before. There is a very slight scuff on the head (see photo) which may have come from years of storage/handling or someone swinging the racquet, but that’s it. The grip and the rest of the racquet show the like-new condition of this collectable racquet.
A denser pattern is often considered to deliver more control, at the expense of spin potential. A more open pattern is often believed to offer greater potential for power and spin. However, how much power is produced by a player can be strongly influenced by how a player adapts to the characteristics of the racket. Some players may hit harder with a dense string pattern, producing faster shots because of the added control from the dense pattern. Rackets, including those of much of the wood era, are marked with a recommended string tension range. The basic rule is that a lower tension creates more power (from the trampoline effect) and a higher string tension creates more control (less string deformation which results in a more predictable the power and angle of the departure from the string bed.) Some professionals used small-headed rackets with flexible-material strings (natural gut) strung at very high tension. Examples include Pete Sampras and Björn Borg. Some used large-headed rackets with very inflexible-material strings (kevlar). Andrei Agassi is an example. Many professionals during the standard wood era strung at relatively low tension and used natural gut string; both decisions were to increase the trampoline effect for more power. By contrast, almost every professional player today uses the much stiffer polyester string in their much stiffer rackets which also have larger heads and which tend to be lighter. Madeline Hauptman sold a line of rackets, called the MAD RAQ, which featured a Star of David pattern (a six-pointed figure consisting of two interlaced equilateral triangles), as it used three strings instead of two for stringing the racket. This pattern is used in snowshoes. This stringing pattern was said to feature less string notching, improving string lifespan. It was even claimed that many pro shops refused to carry the racket because less string breakage would reduce string and stringing service sales. It has also been claimed that the racket is more difficult to string than a two string racket. However, the Wilson T-2000-type requires a great deal more time for stringing than a typical racket and rackets of that series were very popular. Whatever the cause of the failure of the MAD RAQ in the marketplace, it was the only time a snowshoe pattern was used in tennis. Hauptman switched her racket line to a two string diamond pattern (PowerAngle). This pattern had already been used in much earlier rackets but had not had much popularity. It is said to be easier to string than the MAD RAQ but does not have the benefit of reduced string notching, at least not to the same degree. The claim is that this diagonal pattern offers more comfort than a traditional square pattern.
In 2019, the Australian Open introduced a "super-tiebreak" for singles in the final set, replacing the previous format in which the final set would continue until one player was ahead by two games. The new format for the final set is similar to the "12-point tiebreaker", but with the winner being the first to 10 points instead of 7 (and they must still win by 2 points).[27] Tennis Australia has called this a "10-point tiebreak", though this is inconsistent with the reasoning behind the naming of the "12-point tiebreaker", which represents the minimum total number of points (a score of 7–5); the same reasoning would make the new format an "18-point tiebreaker" with a minimum winning score of 10–8.[28]
Hello my name is Rafael Alvarez I am currently a tennis professional at La Gorce Country Club. I have been teaching for 3 years now, the previous two years I worked for Cliff Drysdale: one and half years at Ritz Carlton, Key Biscayne and four months at South Hamptons, New York . I have taught in some very respectable facilities that require the utmost professionalism. As a tennis player I have many accomplishments, since I was young I was always a top 30 player in USTA Junior tennis winning many tournaments along the way. In High School I was a state doubles champion with Emilio Teran; my freshman year the team came in 3 place in States an ... View Profile

The reason is simple – the coach knows that repetition is the mother of skill and a tennis beginner will have to make many repetitions before he'll be able to master the stroke. And one more thing – the stroke is not only the arm movement, but consists of the movement to the ball, stopping, balancing and hitting the ball. It's a complex action which takes time to become our second nature.

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Takes All Comers: Since most of the best tennis rackets run in the $200 range, we wanted to give the entry-level buyer something that would give them quality and control without ruining their budget. Prince rackets generally cater to a slightly less affluent clientele, but they still make incredible, versatile stuff for the price. Their original Red is a great place to start. No matter what kind of play style you have, the large sweet spot sunk into the friendly 105 square-inch head is a bargain at twice the price. The 9.9oz weight works well for anyone with tennis elbow or the casual player who needs to adjust to moving a racket around. Whether you are a baseliner needing speed and power or a net player that wants size, the Red is a very solid, if not particularly flashy or sexy choice. [Purchase: $80]


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The players (or teams) start on opposite sides of the net. One player is designated the server, and the opposing player is the receiver. The choice to be server or receiver in the first game and the choice of ends is decided by a coin toss before the warm-up starts. Service alternates game by game between the two players (or teams). For each point, the server starts behind the baseline, between the center mark and the sideline. The receiver may start anywhere on their side of the net. When the receiver is ready, the server will serve, although the receiver must play to the pace of the server.
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