Vibration dampeners (also sometimes known as "gummies") may be interlaced in the proximal part of the string array, to reduce the percussive sound of the ball hitting the strings and/or to reduce perceived vibration. They do not, however, reduce impact shock significantly, so they are of no safety value.[13] Some professionals, such as Andrei Agassi, used rubber bands instead of specialized dampeners. Dampeners come in two main types. The first uses the two central main strings to hold it in place. The second is sometimes called a "worm" and it is woven between many of the main strings. Dampeners are nearly always placed very near the bottom of the racket string bed.
After this Incident 6 Month Later I injured my Left Ankle in The MRI Scan I found my ankle Ligament is tear so I visited the doctor After getting the report and checking my ankle doctor said you need to take rest couple of month after getting lot of ERP and NIDDLE THERAPY finally after 1.5 year later my ankle is now in that position so that I can play tennis.
A set consists of a sequence of games played with service alternating between games, ending when the count of games won meets certain criteria. Typically, a player wins a set by winning at least six games and at least two games more than the opponent. If one player has won six games and the opponent five, an additional game is played. If the leading player wins that game, the player wins the set 7–5. If the trailing player wins the game (tying the set 6–6) a tie-break is played. A tie-break, played under a separate set of rules, allows one player to win one more game and thus the set, to give a final set score of 7–6. A "love" set means that the loser of the set won zero games, colloquially termed a 'jam donut' in the USA.[55] In tournament play, the chair umpire announces the winner of the set and the overall score. The final score in sets is always read with the winning player's score first, e.g. "6–2, 4–6, 6–0, 7–5".
"Tennis Court" received generally positive reviews from contemporary critics. Siân Rowe from NME complimented Lorde's "strong pop vocals".[31] Emily Yoshida from Grantland labelled it a "murkily winsome, ever-so-slightly chopped ballad",[48] while Kyle Jaeger writing for The Hollywood Reporter commended the track's lyrical content and its "catchy" melody.[49] Billboard's Jason Lipshutz was favourable towards the song's "detached attitude" and minimalist production that evoked "something intoxicating" in the music scene.[29] Sharing the same sentiment, Adam Offitzer from independent music blog Pretty Much Amazing regarded "Tennis Court" as a "[burst] of originality" in the mainstream music scene of "mindless hooks and dubstep anthems" for its minimalism and "clever" lyrics.[23]
"Tennis Court" received positive reviews from music critics, with some highlighting the song's production and lyrical content. The single was a commercial success in Oceania, reaching number one in New Zealand and number 20 in Australia. It received platinum certification in Canada, double platinum certification in New Zealand and triple platinum certification in Australia. "Tennis Court" achieved modest chart success throughout Europe and North America, entering at low-tier positions on charts in Canada, Germany, the UK and the US. Joel Kefali directed the song's accompanying music video, a one shot in which Lorde stares to the camera throughout. "Tennis Court" was included on the set list of Lorde's Pure Heroine Tour (2013–14).
Well, hopefully, this article has helped you learn more about tennis racquets than you knew before you started reading it. Tennis racquets and the technology behind them really are much more complicated than most people think. If you use the information we provided you here in the right way it will really help you very much when you go to purchase your new tennis racquet. It helps you to be well informed when you are trying to find the best tennis racquet for you.
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A tennis match is composed of points, games, and sets. A set consists of a number of games (a minimum of six), which in turn each consist of points. A set is won by the first side to win 6 games, with a margin of at least 2 games over the other side (e.g. 6–3 or 7–5). If the set is tied at six games each, a tie-break is usually played to decide the set. A match is won when a player or a doubles team has won the majority of the prescribed number of sets. Matches employ either a best-of-three (first to two sets wins) or best-of-five (first to three sets wins) set format. The best-of-five set format is usually only used in the men's singles or doubles matches at Grand Slam and Davis Cup matches.
It wasn't until the 16th century that rackets came into use, and the game began to be called "tennis", from the French term tenez, which can be translated as "hold!", "receive!" or "take!", an interjection used as a call from the server to his opponent.[6] It was popular in England and France, although the game was only played indoors where the ball could be hit off the wall. Henry VIII of England was a big fan of this game, which is now known as real tennis.[7] During the 18th and early 19th centuries, as real tennis declined, new racket sports emerged in England.[8]
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