Picking a good one usually depends on your play style. Heavier rackets are slower, but give you more power. Lighter rackets offer maneuverability, but you won’t be able to hit a grand slam. Smaller racket heads concentrate power while larger ones help newer players get a hold of the ball. If you play at the net, you need something light, fast, and large, while baseliners need heavier rackets that give them power and help them drop spin on the ball. You must find the right mix of power and precision to suit your personality. To help you, here is our 7 best tennis rackets.
Easy to play and extremely maneuverable, this Radical racquet is the ideal choice for all beginners and will allow you to climb the ladder. In this version, the Radical benefits from GRAPHENE XT technology.  More power for less effort. Get ready to discover a generation of racquets that will transform your game. From the moment you play with a racquet equipped with the GRAPHENE XT, you’ll never want to do without its natural power again.
Before hiring a local contractor to build your play court, ask plenty of questions and do your research. Tennis court construction is a highly specialized field, so it's important to find a contractor with extensive experience. Kolkmann recommends using someone who is an active member of ASBA, with at least 15% to 20% of annual business devoted to designing and constructing sport surfaces. (ASBA has a searchable database of certified builder members.)
If you have played the game of tennis long enough you know that the highest wear item on your racquet by far is your grip. Not only is subject to constant wear and tear by changing hand positions and by sliding your hands into position on it, but it also rubs on the court surface on occasion and is exposed to sweat and the elements too. It’s no wonder these have to be replaced very often on a tennis racquet.
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A game point occurs in tennis whenever the player who is in the lead in the game needs only one more point to win the game. The terminology is extended to sets (set point), matches (match point), and even championships (championship point). For example, if the player who is serving has a score of 40-love, the player has a triple game point (triple set point, etc.) as the player has three consecutive chances to win the game. Game points, set points, and match points are not part of official scoring and are not announced by the chair umpire in tournament play.
This discussion is very timely for me because not only is it helping me stabilize my game, my daughter is now six and showing interest in “Playing tennis.” When she was four and five that meant catching and sweeping the ball along the floor with a racket back and forth with me, and now it means gripping the child’ racket her aunt brought her with both hands and hitting FH on the soft coach’s ball I toss or hit softly to her. She is a natural leftie, and I showed her a LH grip with two hands, but often she uses the RH backhand grip instead, and I just let her go with it. What is amazing to me is how good her balance is and how well she steps in and rotates through the stroke, pulling the racket through. She is already an accomplished dancer and seems to understand how her body moves, and that clearly helps, but her synthesis of gripping, which she was taught, swinging, which she imitates, and rotating with balance is just natural.

Tennis is played by millions of recreational players and is also a popular worldwide spectator sport. The four Grand Slam tournaments (also referred to as the Majors) are especially popular: the Australian Open played on hard courts, the French Open played on red clay courts, Wimbledon played on grass courts, and the US Open also played on hard courts.

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